Cary NC

After Raleigh and Durham, Cary is the region’s third largest municipality and it has grown tremendously in the past two decades. As a hub of well-educated professionals, Cary has one of the lowest crime rates in the state–making it an idea home for families.

Cary, North Carolina, or the Town of Cary, is located southwest of Raleigh, NC and southeast of Durham, NC. Cary is in Wake County with a small portion in Chatham County. Cary is the third largest city in the triangle behind Raleigh and Durham. Cary was founded in 1750 and incorporated on April 3, 1871. The town was named after Samuel Fenton Cary (February 18, 1814 – September 29, 1900). 

Samuel Fenton Cary was an Ohio farmer, attorney, Paymaster General for the State of Ohio, and US Congressman. He was a Republican who lectured and wrote books on prohibition of alcohol and his anti-slavery stance. While serving in Congress, he was the only Republican Congressman to vote against the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. 

Cary was originally founded as settlement called Bradford’s Ordinary around 1750. Around 1850, a railway line was constructed through Bradford’s Ordinary between New Bern and Hillsborough. The construction and subsequent development of this railway line was the earliest generator of economic growth to the future town of Cary. 

Credit for founding the town is attributed to Allison Francis “Frank” Page. Page was from Wake County and was originally a farmer and lumberman. In 1854, Page and his wife, Catherine “Kate” Raboteau Page purchased 300 acres surrounding the railroad junction. Because of his admiration for Samuel Fenton Cary, Frank Page named his new development Cary.

In his new development of Cary, Frank Page did his own city planning by laying out and naming all the streets. He also constructed a sawmill to provide the wood to build the town. Frank Page built a general store and the first post office. He became Cary’s first postmaster. Page built a hotel for the train passengers visiting Cary. With the incorporating on April 3, 1871, Frank Page became the first Mayor of Cary.     

Because of the growth with the Research Triangle Park (RTP), Cary adapted a more structured approach to current and future development. In 1971, Cary adapted a Planned Unit Development (PUD) zoning process. A PUD requires developers to meet the requirements of the overall current community and future community with planning for the roads, amenities, building requirements, and the new community covenants. The intention of PUD zoning is to prevent haphazard growth and standards with developers. 

Cary’s population in the 1880 US Census was 316. The 2010 US Census had Cary’s population at 135,234. The 2019 estimated population was 170,282.

Money Magazine ranked Cary 55th in the United States in their Best Places to Live survey.

Cary’s economic history can be divided into two periods, “Before Research Triangle Park” and “After Research Triangle Park.” Before the development of RTP, Cary was more of a bedroom community for workers in Raleigh and Durham. 

The genesis of the Research Triangle Park is traced back to post World War II and the need to reinvent the economy of North Carolina. Business and employment conditions were changing from textiles, agriculture, and furniture that had dominated the state for at least a century. This industrial transition was due to automation, modernization, and a more educated workforce. Modernization and automation of many traditionally labor-intensive industries post World War II was eliminating many workers in North Carolina and nationally. Due to the GI Bill, many returning veterans were attending schools of higher learning and were becoming more highly skilled. 

North Carolina politicians, businesses, and academia were forced to reconsider business processes and the related labor dynamics to move the state into the future. In the 1950s, North Carolina colleges were overflowing with students seeking advanced learning. North Carolina was producing a higher educated workforce and the North Carolina business environment needed to reinvent itself to take advantage of this type of workforce.   

Many established North Carolina businesses were modernizing and were in search of employees who could aid in this process. Politicians were wanting to keep these highly educated constituents and current businesses in the state. Politicians were also hoping to attract new businesses to the state who were seeking an educated workforce.   

This atmosphere to reinvent the state economy led to academics at North Carolina State University and Duke University developing the concept of a “park” so that both universities could do research together, along with other nearby institutes of higher learning. There are nine other colleges and universities in the area with an abundance of highly skilled workers who would build on this concept. The Research Triangle Park (RTP) was established in 1959 to accomplish all these goals of education and innovation. The “Triangle” in Research Triangle Park comes from the three leading research higher educational institutes in the area, Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Cary is essentially located in the bottom right of this triangle.

The Research Triangle Park began to gain real traction in the 1980s and this can be observed through the population increases in Cary during this time frame. The Research Triangle Park is the largest research park in the United States and one of the largest in the world. RTP is home to more than 200 global companies including SAS Institute, Verizon, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Met Life, ABB, Inc., HCL American, and American Airlines.

Cary’s population since Research Triangle Park was established through the US Census: 

1950     1,446 26.7%

1960 3,356 132.1%

1970 7,686 129.0%

1980 21,763 183.2%

1990 43,858 101.5%

2000 94,536 115.6%

2010 135,234 43.1%

2019 (est.) 170,282 25.9%

Cary is roughly located in the center of the Research Triangle Park. Cary is strategically located on the U.S Interstate 40 and Interstate 85 corridor. Raleigh, NC (9 Miles), Durham, NC (19 Miles), Chapel Hill, NC ( 22 Miles), Charlotte ( 159 Miles), and Washington, DC ( 274 Miles). 

Commercial air service for Cary is through Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU). The following airlines serve Raleigh-Durham: Air Canada Express, Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, American Eagle, Delta Air Lines, Delta Connection, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines, Sun Country Airlines, United Airlines, and United Express. Cary has an Amtrak station with regular service.

Cary is well known for its extensive network of Greenways and Trails. Along with the many miles of sidewalks throughout Cary, it is probably one of the most walkable places in America. 

The Cary educational systems are well rated from primary, secondary, through collegiate. There are 11 top ranked colleges or universities in the Cary area with the majority having sports programs. 

Arts and Culture in Cary

-Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival

-Spring Daze Arts & Crafts Festival

-Greater Triangle Area Dragon Boat Festival

-Cary Diwali Celebration – Festival of Light

-Ritmo Latino Music  and Art Festival

-North Carolina Eid Festival

-Cary Band Day

Need Association Management?

Contact Us

Cary

After Raleigh and Durham, Cary is the region’s third largest municipality and it has grown tremendously in the past two decades. As a hub of well-educated professionals, Cary has one of the lowest crime rates in the state–making it an idea home for families.

Cary, North Carolina, or the Town of Cary, is located southwest of Raleigh, NC and southeast of Durham, NC. Cary is in Wake County with a small portion in Chatham County. Cary is the third largest city in the triangle behind Raleigh and Durham. Cary was founded in 1750 and incorporated on April 3, 1871. The town was named after Samuel Fenton Cary (February 18, 1814 – September 29, 1900).

Samuel Fenton Cary was an Ohio farmer, attorney, Paymaster General for the State of Ohio, and US Congressman. He was a Republican who lectured and wrote books on prohibition of alcohol and his anti-slavery stance. While serving in Congress, he was the only Republican Congressman to vote against the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.

Cary was originally founded as settlement called Bradford’s Ordinary around 1750. Around 1850, a railway line was constructed through Bradford’s Ordinary between New Bern and Hillsborough. The construction and subsequent development of this railway line was the earliest generator of economic growth to the future town of Cary.

Credit for founding the town is attributed to Allison Francis “Frank” Page. Page was from Wake County and was originally a farmer and lumberman. In 1854, Page and his wife, Catherine “Kate” Raboteau Page purchased 300 acres surrounding the railroad junction. Because of his admiration for Samuel Fenton Cary, Frank Page named his new development Cary.

In his new development of Cary, Frank Page did his own city planning by laying out and naming all the streets. He also constructed a sawmill to provide the wood to build the town. Frank Page built a general store and the first post office. He became Cary’s first postmaster. Page built a hotel for the train passengers visiting Cary. With the incorporating on April 3, 1871, Frank Page became the first Mayor of Cary.     

Because of the growth with the Research Triangle Park (RTP), Cary adapted a more structured approach to current and future development. In 1971, Cary adapted a Planned Unit Development (PUD) zoning process. A PUD requires developers to meet the requirements of the overall current community and future community with planning for the roads, amenities, building requirements, and the new community covenants. The intention of PUD zoning is to prevent haphazard growth and standards with developers.

Cary’s population in the 1880 US Census was 316. The 2010 US Census had Cary’s population at 135,234. The 2019 estimated population was 170,282.

Money Magazine ranked Cary 55th in the United States in their Best Places to Live survey.

Cary’s economic history can be divided into two periods, “Before Research Triangle Park” and “After Research Triangle Park.” Before the development of RTP, Cary was more of a bedroom community for workers in Raleigh and Durham.

The genesis of the Research Triangle Park is traced back to post World War II and the need to reinvent the economy of North Carolina. Business and employment conditions were changing from textiles, agriculture, and furniture that had dominated the state for at least a century. This industrial transition was due to automation, modernization, and a more educated workforce. Modernization and automation of many traditionally labor-intensive industries post World War II was eliminating many workers in North Carolina and nationally. Due to the GI Bill, many returning veterans were attending schools of higher learning and were becoming more highly skilled.

North Carolina politicians, businesses, and academia were forced to reconsider business processes and the related labor dynamics to move the state into the future. In the 1950s, North Carolina colleges were overflowing with students seeking advanced learning. North Carolina was producing a higher educated workforce and the North Carolina business environment needed to reinvent itself to take advantage of this type of workforce.   

Many established North Carolina businesses were modernizing and were in search of employees who could aid in this process. Politicians were wanting to keep these highly educated constituents and current businesses in the state. Politicians were also hoping to attract new businesses to the state who were seeking an educated workforce.   

This atmosphere to reinvent the state economy led to academics at North Carolina State University and Duke University developing the concept of a “park” so that both universities could do research together, along with other nearby institutes of higher learning. There are nine other colleges and universities in the area with an abundance of highly skilled workers who would build on this concept. The Research Triangle Park (RTP) was established in 1959 to accomplish all these goals of education and innovation. The “Triangle” in Research Triangle Park comes from the three leading research higher educational institutes in the area, Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Cary is essentially located in the bottom right of this triangle.

The Research Triangle Park began to gain real traction in the 1980s and this can be observed through the population increases in Cary during this time frame. The Research Triangle Park is the largest research park in the United States and one of the largest in the world. RTP is home to more than 200 global companies including SAS Institute, Verizon, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Met Life, ABB, Inc., HCL American, and American Airlines.

Cary’s population since Research Triangle Park was established through the US Census:

1950     1,446 26.7%

1960 3,356 132.1%

1970 7,686 129.0%

1980 21,763 183.2%

1990 43,858 101.5%

2000 94,536 115.6%

2010 135,234 43.1%

2019 (est.) 170,282 25.9%

Cary is roughly located in the center of the Research Triangle Park. Cary is strategically located on the U.S Interstate 40 and Interstate 85 corridor. Raleigh, NC (9 Miles), Durham, NC (19 Miles), Chapel Hill, NC ( 22 Miles), Charlotte ( 159 Miles), and Washington, DC ( 274 Miles).

Commercial air service for Cary is through Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU). The following airlines serve Raleigh-Durham: Air Canada Express, Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, American Eagle, Delta Air Lines, Delta Connection, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines, Sun Country Airlines, United Airlines, and United Express. Cary has an Amtrak station with regular service.

Cary is well known for its extensive network of Greenways and Trails. Along with the many miles of sidewalks throughout Cary, it is probably one of the most walkable places in America.

The Cary educational systems are well rated from primary, secondary, through collegiate. There are 11 top ranked colleges or universities in the Cary area with the majority having sports programs.

Arts and Culture in Cary

-Lazy Daze Arts & Crafts Festival

-Spring Daze Arts & Crafts Festival

-Greater Triangle Area Dragon Boat Festival

-Cary Diwali Celebration – Festival of Light

-Ritmo Latino Music  and Art Festival

-North Carolina Eid Festival

-Cary Band Day

Need Association Management?

Contact Us