columbia

HOA MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN COLUMBIA, SC

As the state capital of South Carolina, there’s quite a bit going on in Columbia.

From a revitalized downtown area to a world-class university at the University of South Carolina, residents of all types are drawn to the state capital. If you are looking for HOA management for your residential community, William Douglas Property Management has decades of experience working with homeowners associations that serve single family homes, townhouse communities, and condominiums. Our experience, combined with our in-depth knowledge of Columbia, gives us a clear advantage to other firms.

Columbia, or the City of Columbia, South Carolina, is the state capital. It is located primarily within Richland County, with a small portion within Lexington County. Columbia is also the county seat for Richland County. Columbia was originally selected as the state capital because of its location in the center of South Carolina. The city is actually located approximately 13 miles northwest of the center of the state. The estimated population for Columbia for 2019 per the U.S. Census Bureau was 131,674. Columbia has a total area of 132.21 square miles per the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau. Latitude: 34°0′2″N, Longitude: 81°2′5″W. The standard street delivery zip codes for Columbia are 29044, 29045, 29061, 29063, 29201, 29203, 29204, 29205, 29206, 29209, 29210, 29212, 29222, 29223, and 29229. The post office box delivery zip codes are 29147, 29202, 29207, 29211, 29221, 29224, 29228, 29230, 29240, 29250, 29260, 29290, and 29292. Telephone area codes for Columbia are 803 and 839.

Columbia is the center of the Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses Richland County and the five surrounding counties of Calhoun, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, and Saluda. The estimated population of the Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area as of 2020 was 847,397. Making it the second largest MSA in South Carolina behind Greenville. The Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 69th largest, as measured by population, in the United States.

The name origin of Columbia is derived from Christopher Columbus. Columbia has been traditionally abbreviated as “Cola.” This has led to the moniker “Soda City.” Columbia is located in the Midlands Region of South Carolina. Columbia sits at the confluence of the Broad and Saluda rivers, which merge to form the Congaree River. 

A Brief Historical Overview of Columbia & the Surrounding Area / 

Part One – Up to the end of the American Revolution

The Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto was the first European to document the future Columbia area. De Soto was the first European explorer to lead an expedition deep into what would become the United States. The objective of his expedition was an overland route to China and treasure. This expedition is documented in the semi-anonymous work of a Gentleman of Elvas, supposedly a member of the expedition published in 1557. A report of the expedition completed in 1544 by Luys Hernández de Biedma, another expedition member, documented the route and people encountered. De Soto’s secretary Rodrigo Ranjel’s diary, was used as the basis of Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés writing of La historia general y natural de las Indias, published in 1851.

De Soto’s chroniclers documented the Native American inhabitants who were ruled by a chiefdom or political system known as the Cofitachequi. The Cofitachequi was a chiefdom of Muskogean-speaking Indian people located in an area of present-day South Carolina. The Cofitachequi ruled over an area in northeastern South Carolina, generally considered to be the area between the Santee, Wateree, and Pee Dee rivers.   

De Soto entered what would become South Carolina in search of the chiefdom of Cofitachequi in April of 1540. The chiefdom was reported to have had vast amounts of gold. De Soto’s expedition is thought to have traveled just south of present-day Columbia to the capital of the Cofitachequi chiefdom, a town referred to as “Talimeco,” thought to have been near present-day Camden. The people of the Cofitachiqui capital offered freshwater pearls and fed the Spaniards in attempts at pacifying the expedition members. Nonetheless, the Spaniards, not satisfied with the food and tribute, pillaged the town for more pearls and food. 

The Spaniards did encounter a woman, chronicled as very beautiful, transported on a litter covered in white cloth. It is reported that one of de Soto’s Native American guides named Perico, told de Soto that this woman was only the niece or only a relation of the female chief of Cofitachiqui. No matter the case, the Spaniards believed this woman to be the chief. She became known as the “Lady of Cofitachiqui” by the Spaniards. Taking the Lady of Cofitachiqui as a hostage and everything else of value, de Soto journeyed on northwest into present-day North Carolina. Subsequently, the Lady of Cofitachiqui escaped the expedition and returned to the Cofitachiqui. 

 

In the 1600s, the Congaree Indians lived along the Congaree River in what would become Columbia. The Congaree or Conagree Indians were a distinct tribe with a distinct language. This tribe was not of Siouan language origin, which was the language basis of most of the neighboring Native American tribes in the region. As with many Native American tribes, diseases that were introduced by European explorers, traders, and settlers, devastated the Congaree people. Smallpox wiped out most of the Congaree by 1700.   

The expedition of the Carolina backcountry by English explorer John Lawson encountered the surviving Congaree Indians in 1701. He notes his encounter with the surviving Congaree Indians in his published work of the expedition, A New Voyage to Carolina, published in 1709. He spells Congaree as “Congeree,”   

From that work, “The Congerees are kind and affable to the English, the Queen being very kind, giving us what Rarities her Cabin afforded…These are a very comely Sort of Indians, there being a strange Difference in the Proportion and Beauty of these Heathens.” Lawson denotes in his expedition journal the tribe being small because of smallpox and, to a limited degree, tribal warfare.

The Congaree Indians fought along with English colonist John Barnwell in the Tuscarora War of 1711. An important event took place in 1715 when Barnwell conducted and documented a census of the surviving Congaree. The Congaree was determined as all living in one village, with a total population of 22 men and 70 women and children.

In the Yamasee War of 1715, the Congaree allied with other Native American tribes against the South Carolina colonist. The outcome of this conflict left half the Congaree population either dead or enslaved by the colonists or the Cherokee Indians. The last surviving members migrated north and integrated with the Catawba Indians. Within the Catawba Indian tribe, the Congaree maintained their tribal distinction until the late 18th century. However, the tribe became extinct as descendants intermarried with the Catawba Indians and other Native American tribes.

The original Fort Congaree (also known as Old Fort Congaree) was built in 1718 in close proximity to the old Congaree Indian village. This fort was located along the Cherokee Path between Congaree Creek and Congaree River in Lexington County, near present-day State Road S. 32-66 in Columbia. This short-lived British colonial fort was also a trading post, and as a result, a colonial settlement developed. The fort was abandoned in 1722 by the British garrison and turned over to the local settlers.  

The British colonial government established the second Fort Congaree or New Fort Congaree in 1748. It was constructed in present-day Cayce, in Lexington County, along the Cherokee Path. Approximately two miles north of the Old Fort Congaree. The fort was built in response to French-backed Indian raids against English settlements. The construction of the palisaded fort took seven months to complete, from August 1748 until February 1749. The garrison abandoned the fort in 1754 to accompany Colonel George Washington’s punitive expedition to Ohio. The fort was never regarrisoned. 

The colonial government in Charleston in 1754 established a ferry to connect the settlement on the eastern side of the Congaree with the fort on the western side. 

Being designated the state capital is what literally put Columbia on the map. After the American Revolution in 1786, the South Carolina legislature picked a new capital located in the center of the state. The name “Columbia” was chosen by a vote of 11 to 7 in the state senate. The legislature first met in Columbia in 1790. 

Total households 2015-2019: 47,162

The City of Columbia had 13,080 businesses or firms within the city limits as of the 2012 U.S. Census.

Columbia Office
1722 Main St Suite 150
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 758-1066

columbia

HOA MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN COLUMBIA, SC

As the state capital of South Carolina, there’s quite a bit going on in Columbia.

From a revitalized downtown area to a world-class university at the University of South Carolina, residents of all types are drawn to the state capital. If you are looking for HOA management for your residential community, William Douglas Property Management has decades of experience working with homeowners associations that serve single family homes, townhouse communities, and condominiums. Our experience, combined with our in-depth knowledge of Columbia, gives us a clear advantage to other firms.

Columbia, or the City of Columbia, South Carolina, is the state capital. It is located primarily within Richland County, with a small portion within Lexington County. Columbia is also the county seat for Richland County. Columbia was originally selected as the state capital because of its location in the center of South Carolina. The city is actually located approximately 13 miles northwest of the center of the state. The estimated population for Columbia for 2019 per the U.S. Census Bureau was 131,674. Columbia has a total area of 132.21 square miles per the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau. Latitude: 34°0′2″N, Longitude: 81°2′5″W. The standard street delivery zip codes for Columbia are 29044, 29045, 29061, 29063, 29201, 29203, 29204, 29205, 29206, 29209, 29210, 29212, 29222, 29223, and 29229. The post office box delivery zip codes are 29147, 29202, 29207, 29211, 29221, 29224, 29228, 29230, 29240, 29250, 29260, 29290, and 29292. Telephone area codes for Columbia are 803 and 839.

Columbia is the center of the Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses Richland County and the five surrounding counties of Calhoun, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, and Saluda. The estimated population of the Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area as of 2020 was 847,397. Making it the second largest MSA in South Carolina behind Greenville. The Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 69th largest, as measured by population, in the United States.

The name origin of Columbia is derived from Christopher Columbus. Columbia has been traditionally abbreviated as “Cola.” This has led to the moniker “Soda City.” Columbia is located in the Midlands Region of South Carolina. Columbia sits at the confluence of the Broad and Saluda rivers, which merge to form the Congaree River.

A Brief Historical Overview of Columbia & the Surrounding Area /

Part One – Up to the end of the American Revolution

The Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto was the first European to document the future Columbia area. De Soto was the first European explorer to lead an expedition deep into what would become the United States. The objective of his expedition was an overland route to China and treasure. This expedition is documented in the semi-anonymous work of a Gentleman of Elvas, supposedly a member of the expedition published in 1557. A report of the expedition completed in 1544 by Luys Hernández de Biedma, another expedition member, documented the route and people encountered. De Soto’s secretary Rodrigo Ranjel’s diary, was used as the basis of Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés writing of La historia general y natural de las Indias, published in 1851.

De Soto’s chroniclers documented the Native American inhabitants who were ruled by a chiefdom or political system known as the Cofitachequi. The Cofitachequi was a chiefdom of Muskogean-speaking Indian people located in an area of present-day South Carolina. The Cofitachequi ruled over an area in northeastern South Carolina, generally considered to be the area between the Santee, Wateree, and Pee Dee rivers.   

De Soto entered what would become South Carolina in search of the chiefdom of Cofitachequi in April of 1540. The chiefdom was reported to have had vast amounts of gold. De Soto’s expedition is thought to have traveled just south of present-day Columbia to the capital of the Cofitachequi chiefdom, a town referred to as “Talimeco,” thought to have been near present-day Camden. The people of the Cofitachiqui capital offered freshwater pearls and fed the Spaniards in attempts at pacifying the expedition members. Nonetheless, the Spaniards, not satisfied with the food and tribute, pillaged the town for more pearls and food.

The Spaniards did encounter a woman, chronicled as very beautiful, transported on a litter covered in white cloth. It is reported that one of de Soto’s Native American guides named Perico, told de Soto that this woman was only the niece or only a relation of the female chief of Cofitachiqui. No matter the case, the Spaniards believed this woman to be the chief. She became known as the “Lady of Cofitachiqui” by the Spaniards. Taking the Lady of Cofitachiqui as a hostage and everything else of value, de Soto journeyed on northwest into present-day North Carolina. Subsequently, the Lady of Cofitachiqui escaped the expedition and returned to the Cofitachiqui.

 

In the 1600s, the Congaree Indians lived along the Congaree River in what would become Columbia. The Congaree or Conagree Indians were a distinct tribe with a distinct language. This tribe was not of Siouan language origin, which was the language basis of most of the neighboring Native American tribes in the region. As with many Native American tribes, diseases that were introduced by European explorers, traders, and settlers, devastated the Congaree people. Smallpox wiped out most of the Congaree by 1700.   

The expedition of the Carolina backcountry by English explorer John Lawson encountered the surviving Congaree Indians in 1701. He notes his encounter with the surviving Congaree Indians in his published work of the expedition, A New Voyage to Carolina, published in 1709. He spells Congaree as “Congeree,”   

From that work, “The Congerees are kind and affable to the English, the Queen being very kind, giving us what Rarities her Cabin afforded…These are a very comely Sort of Indians, there being a strange Difference in the Proportion and Beauty of these Heathens.” Lawson denotes in his expedition journal the tribe being small because of smallpox and, to a limited degree, tribal warfare.

The Congaree Indians fought along with English colonist John Barnwell in the Tuscarora War of 1711. An important event took place in 1715 when Barnwell conducted and documented a census of the surviving Congaree. The Congaree was determined as all living in one village, with a total population of 22 men and 70 women and children.

In the Yamasee War of 1715, the Congaree allied with other Native American tribes against the South Carolina colonist. The outcome of this conflict left half the Congaree population either dead or enslaved by the colonists or the Cherokee Indians. The last surviving members migrated north and integrated with the Catawba Indians. Within the Catawba Indian tribe, the Congaree maintained their tribal distinction until the late 18th century. However, the tribe became extinct as descendants intermarried with the Catawba Indians and other Native American tribes.

The original Fort Congaree (also known as Old Fort Congaree) was built in 1718 in close proximity to the old Congaree Indian village. This fort was located along the Cherokee Path between Congaree Creek and Congaree River in Lexington County, near present-day State Road S. 32-66 in Columbia. This short-lived British colonial fort was also a trading post, and as a result, a colonial settlement developed. The fort was abandoned in 1722 by the British garrison and turned over to the local settlers.

The British colonial government established the second Fort Congaree or New Fort Congaree in 1748. It was constructed in present-day Cayce, in Lexington County, along the Cherokee Path. Approximately two miles north of the Old Fort Congaree. The fort was built in response to French-backed Indian raids against English settlements. The construction of the palisaded fort took seven months to complete, from August 1748 until February 1749. The garrison abandoned the fort in 1754 to accompany Colonel George Washington’s punitive expedition to Ohio. The fort was never regarrisoned.

The colonial government in Charleston in 1754 established a ferry to connect the settlement on the eastern side of the Congaree with the fort on the western side.

Being designated the state capital is what literally put Columbia on the map. After the American Revolution in 1786, the South Carolina legislature picked a new capital located in the center of the state. The name “Columbia” was chosen by a vote of 11 to 7 in the state senate. The legislature first met in Columbia in 1790.

Total households 2015-2019: 47,162

The City of Columbia had 13,080 businesses or firms within the city limits as of the 2012 U.S. Census.

Columbia Office
1722 Main St Suite 150
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 758-1066