Charleston

HOA MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN CHARLESTON, SC

There are few places filled with the architectural beauty, the natural wonders, and the expansive local amenities as Charleston, South Carolina. This city is known for its historic downtown; however residents appreciate it for beauty that far exceeds the old buildings in its core. The white sand beaches, warm ocean breezes are iconic and mesmerizing – one step onto Folly Beach pier and you’ll understand why many never want to leave this beautiful city.

Charleston is located in the coastal region of South Carolina on the Atlantic Ocean and at a natural harbor created by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. The elevation is 20′ above sea level. Charleston’s population per the 2010 U.S. Census was 120,083. The U.S. Census population estimate for 2019 was 137,566. This is an estimated 14.6% population increase in under ten years. Charleston is the largest municipality in South Carolina. The metropolitan area population is estimated at just over 800,000. Per the U.S. Census, Charleston has a total area of 108.98 square miles. Latitude – 32°47′00″N, Longitude – 79°56′00″W.

The street delivery zip codes for Charleston are 29401, 29403, 29405, 29406, 29407, 29409, 29412, 29414, 29424, 29425, 29445, 29450, 29455, 29464, 29487, and 29492. P.O. Box delivery zip codes are 29402, 29413, 29416, 29417, 29422, and 29423. The area codes for Charleston are 843 and 854.

The first successful permanent English settlement in South Carolina, Charleston, was founded in 1670 as Charles Town. The original name was derived from and in honor of English King Charles II. The original site of the Charleston settlement was located on Albemarle Point on the west bank of the Ashley River, now known as Charles Towne Landing, in West Ashely. The settlement was relocated to its current location in 1680. From its founding in 1670 up until 1783, the city was called Charles Town, which evolved into Charlestown. After 1783, the end of the American Revolution, the name was truncated to Charleston.

Historical Overview of Charleston – The Founding (Part One)

After English King Charles II was restored to the throne in 1660, he shortly thereafter rewarded eight loyal followers with the land encompassing the “Carolina” territory. These eight men had remained loyal to Charles II and supported his restoration to the English throne. This land grant was done through the Carolina land charters of 1663 and 1665.

These loyal eight men became known as the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolina. Even though Charles II retained sovereignty over Carolina, the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina had broad powers to govern and promote immigration to the territory. To induce immigration, the Lord’s Proprietors were offering 500 acres of land for each subscriber to a proposed company in return for 1,000 pounds of sugar. The Lords Proprietors had taxing abilities, along with game and mineral ownership rights. They eventually established a civil authority to maintain the functions of government, along with a judiciary to maintain law and order.

The Lord’s Proprietors used the “Grand Model” or “Grand Modell” as the basis for the Carolina territory’s development. English philosopher John Locke and the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury are created with the authorship of the Grand Model. It was comprised of a constitution along with a settlement and development plan for the colony. The Grand Model’s constitution was named the “Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, and could be considered radical for that time period.” This document was comprised of 120 articles or sections. These articles addressed many topics, but most notably religious tolerance that was lacking in Europe at that time. Impressed with the religious freedom in the document, French writer and philosopher Voltaire was noted as saying, “Cast your eyes over the other hemisphere, behold Carolina, of which the wise Locke was the legislator.”

The settlement and development plan of the Grand Model were comprised of documents outlining the establishment of settlements along with regional planning as well as economic development. The impetus for the extensive planning of settlements found in the Grand Model was the Great Fire of London in 1666. The London fire burned for five days and destroyed an estimated 13,200 homes and almost all the city government buildings. Those parts of London affected by the fire were reconstructed and laid out with consideration for the population’s health and safety, aesthetics, and efficiency of land use. The principles of the population’s health and safety, aesthetics, and efficiency of land use being used in consideration of a city’s layout had never been considered before. Many of these principles or considerations were adopted for the Carolina colony. However, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina were never ratified, resulting in the colonial government dealing with many of these issues by other means. Charles Town was under the authority of the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolina from founding until 1729.

After the initial King’s land charter of 1663, it would be seven years before the Lords Proprietors established the first permanent English settlement of Charles Town in 1670. The departure from England of these original settlers is noted in the London Gazette, England, September 6, 1669, edition with the following quote: “Falmouth, August 30”, “…Carolina, the Albemarle and one other ship (the Port Royal) bound with passengers for the Plantation of Carolina, a Colony in America, which three last put to sea the 28th instant with a fair wind…” The Carolina was the largest, a three-mast ship of around 200 tons. While a passenger list was compiled in Falmouth before departure, accounts vary from 92 to 150 passengers. However, historians generally accept the lower number to be a more accurate representation. The Port Royal was a three-mast ship of around 100 tons. The Albemarle was the much smaller of the three, a single-mast ship of around 30 tons. 

The three ships sailed under the ultimate command of Captain Joseph West. West was retained by the Lords Proprietors to sail from the southern English port of Falmouth to the Port of Kinsale, Ireland, and then onto Barbados, with an ultimate destination of Port Royal, Carolina (Beaufort, SC). The three ships reached the Port of Kinsale in hopes of recruiting more colonists for the journey to Port Royal; however, a few passengers disembarked instead.

Departing Ireland on September 17, 1669, the three ships reached the Port of Saint Michael (Bridgetown), Barbados, in October of 1669, after forty days at sea and roughly 3,500 nautical miles traveled. The ships remained for several weeks, and on November 2, a severe storm sank the Albemarle. The sloop (single-mast ship), the Three Brothers, was engaged to replace the sunken Albemarle and carry her passengers. The three ships departed Barbados and soon became separated when severe storms were encountered. The Port Royal foundered and sank in the Bahamas. The Carolina and the Three Brothers stopped at the island of Nevis to take shelter from the storms and then departed for Bermuda. The Three Fingers was blown off-course en route to the Virginia coast.   The Carolina, after an eventful 1,200 nautical mile voyage from Barbados, arrived in Bermuda on January 12, 1670. 

The Carolina set out alone from Bermuda on February 26, 1670, and while the original destination had been Port Royal, the initial landing was in the marshes of Seewee Bay, near present-day Bull Island around March 21, 1670. Upon the Carolina’s arrival, the Native Americans, the Kiawah people, were extremely friendly to the landing party. The new colonist debated where to establish their settlement and sailed the Carolina to the original destination of Port Royal. The Kiawah’s cassique or chief persuaded the colonist to look at a site further down the coast, at a site that would become Albemarle Point. 

Sending a sloop to investigate the Albemarle Point site, the colonist sailed south along the coast to a confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. These three rivers merging at this point and running into the Atlantic Ocean over thousands of years had formed a natural harbor now known as Charleston Harbor. Approximately eight miles into the harbor and traveling up the Ashely River, the settlers established the first settlement at Albemarle Point. Albemarle Point is on the west bank of the Ashley River, in now what is considered the West Ashely area of Charleston. This original settlement was named Charles Town, and within ten years, in 1680, it was abandoned.

William Douglas Management has been providing quality association management services to Charleston, South Carolina since 1980. We exclusively manage Homeowner Associations, Condominium Owner Associations, and Commercial Condominium Owner Associations.

William Douglas Property Management offers professional HOA association management in Charleston, SC and its surrounding areas. If you are looking for full-service community association management contact our team at 843.225.7770 or click here to request a proposal. We look forward to discussing with you how we can bring the best to your community.

 

Charleston Office
3 Gamecock Ave Suite 307
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 225-7770

Charleston

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN CHARLESTON

There are few places filled with the architectural beauty, the natural wonders, and the expansive local amenities as Charleston, South Carolina. This city is known for its historic downtown; however residents appreciate it for beauty that far exceeds the old buildings in its core. The white sand beaches, warm ocean breezes are iconic and mesmerizing – one step onto Folly Beach pier and you’ll understand why many never want to leave this beautiful city.

Charleston is located in the coastal region of South Carolina on the Atlantic Ocean and at a natural harbor created by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. The elevation is 20′ above sea level. Charleston’s population per the 2010 U.S. Census was 120,083. The U.S. Census population estimate for 2019 was 137,566. This is an estimated 14.6% population increase in under ten years. Charleston is the largest municipality in South Carolina. The metropolitan area population is estimated at just over 800,000. Per the U.S. Census, Charleston has a total area of 108.98 square miles. Latitude – 32°47′00″N, Longitude – 79°56′00″W.

The street delivery zip codes for Charleston are 29401, 29403, 29405, 29406, 29407, 29409, 29412, 29414, 29424, 29425, 29445, 29450, 29455, 29464, 29487, and 29492. P.O. Box delivery zip codes are 29402, 29413, 29416, 29417, 29422, and 29423. The area codes for Charleston are 843 and 854.

The first successful permanent English settlement in South Carolina, Charleston, was founded in 1670 as Charles Town. The original name was derived from and in honor of English King Charles II. The original site of the Charleston settlement was located on Albemarle Point on the west bank of the Ashley River, now known as Charles Towne Landing, in West Ashely. The settlement was relocated to its current location in 1680. From its founding in 1670 up until 1783, the city was called Charles Town, which evolved into Charlestown. After 1783, the end of the American Revolution, the name was truncated to Charleston.

Historical Overview of Charleston – The Founding (Part One)

After English King Charles II was restored to the throne in 1660, he shortly thereafter rewarded eight loyal followers with the land encompassing the “Carolina” territory. These eight men had remained loyal to Charles II and supported his restoration to the English throne. This land grant was done through the Carolina land charters of 1663 and 1665.

These loyal eight men became known as the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolina. Even though Charles II retained sovereignty over Carolina, the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina had broad powers to govern and promote immigration to the territory. To induce immigration, the Lord’s Proprietors were offering 500 acres of land for each subscriber to a proposed company in return for 1,000 pounds of sugar. The Lords Proprietors had taxing abilities, along with game and mineral ownership rights. They eventually established a civil authority to maintain the functions of government, along with a judiciary to maintain law and order.

The Lord’s Proprietors used the “Grand Model” or “Grand Modell” as the basis for the Carolina territory’s development. English philosopher John Locke and the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury are created with the authorship of the Grand Model. It was comprised of a constitution along with a settlement and development plan for the colony. The Grand Model’s constitution was named the “Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, and could be considered radical for that time period.” This document was comprised of 120 articles or sections. These articles addressed many topics, but most notably religious tolerance that was lacking in Europe at that time. Impressed with the religious freedom in the document, French writer and philosopher Voltaire was noted as saying, “Cast your eyes over the other hemisphere, behold Carolina, of which the wise Locke was the legislator.”

The settlement and development plan of the Grand Model were comprised of documents outlining the establishment of settlements along with regional planning as well as economic development. The impetus for the extensive planning of settlements found in the Grand Model was the Great Fire of London in 1666. The London fire burned for five days and destroyed an estimated 13,200 homes and almost all the city government buildings. Those parts of London affected by the fire were reconstructed and laid out with consideration for the population’s health and safety, aesthetics, and efficiency of land use. The principles of the population’s health and safety, aesthetics, and efficiency of land use being used in consideration of a city’s layout had never been considered before. Many of these principles or considerations were adopted for the Carolina colony. However, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina were never ratified, resulting in the colonial government dealing with many of these issues by other means. Charles Town was under the authority of the Lord’s Proprietors of the Carolina from founding until 1729.

After the initial King’s land charter of 1663, it would be seven years before the Lords Proprietors established the first permanent English settlement of Charles Town in 1670. The departure from England of these original settlers is noted in the London Gazette, England, September 6, 1669, edition with the following quote: “Falmouth, August 30”, “…Carolina, the Albemarle and one other ship (the Port Royal) bound with passengers for the Plantation of Carolina, a Colony in America, which three last put to sea the 28th instant with a fair wind…” The Carolina was the largest, a three-mast ship of around 200 tons. While a passenger list was compiled in Falmouth before departure, accounts vary from 92 to 150 passengers. However, historians generally accept the lower number to be a more accurate representation. The Port Royal was a three-mast ship of around 100 tons. The Albemarle was the much smaller of the three, a single-mast ship of around 30 tons.

The three ships sailed under the ultimate command of Captain Joseph West. West was retained by the Lords Proprietors to sail from the southern English port of Falmouth to the Port of Kinsale, Ireland, and then onto Barbados, with an ultimate destination of Port Royal, Carolina (Beaufort, SC). The three ships reached the Port of Kinsale in hopes of recruiting more colonists for the journey to Port Royal; however, a few passengers disembarked instead.

Departing Ireland on September 17, 1669, the three ships reached the Port of Saint Michael (Bridgetown), Barbados, in October of 1669, after forty days at sea and roughly 3,500 nautical miles traveled. The ships remained for several weeks, and on November 2, a severe storm sank the Albemarle. The sloop (single-mast ship), the Three Brothers, was engaged to replace the sunken Albemarle and carry her passengers. The three ships departed Barbados and soon became separated when severe storms were encountered. The Port Royal foundered and sank in the Bahamas. The Carolina and the Three Brothers stopped at the island of Nevis to take shelter from the storms and then departed for Bermuda. The Three Fingers was blown off-course en route to the Virginia coast.   The Carolina, after an eventful 1,200 nautical mile voyage from Barbados, arrived in Bermuda on January 12, 1670.

The Carolina set out alone from Bermuda on February 26, 1670, and while the original destination had been Port Royal, the initial landing was in the marshes of Seewee Bay, near present-day Bull Island around March 21, 1670. Upon the Carolina’s arrival, the Native Americans, the Kiawah people, were extremely friendly to the landing party. The new colonist debated where to establish their settlement and sailed the Carolina to the original destination of Port Royal. The Kiawah’s cassique or chief persuaded the colonist to look at a site further down the coast, at a site that would become Albemarle Point.

Sending a sloop to investigate the Albemarle Point site, the colonist sailed south along the coast to a confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. These three rivers merging at this point and running into the Atlantic Ocean over thousands of years had formed a natural harbor now known as Charleston Harbor. Approximately eight miles into the harbor and traveling up the Ashely River, the settlers established the first settlement at Albemarle Point. Albemarle Point is on the west bank of the Ashley River, in now what is considered the West Ashely area of Charleston. This original settlement was named Charles Town, and within ten years, in 1680, it was abandoned.

William Douglas Management has been providing quality association management services to Charleston, South Carolina since 1980. We exclusively manage Homeowner Associations, Condominium Owner Associations, and Commercial Condominium Owner Associations.

William Douglas Property Management offers professional HOA association management in Charleston, SC and its surrounding areas. If you are looking for full-service community association management contact our team at 843.225.7770 or click here to request a proposal. We look forward to discussing with you how we can bring the best to your community.

Charleston Office
3 Gamecock Ave Suite 307
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 225-7770