Hendersonville NC

HOA MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN HENDERSONVILLE, NC

Hendersonville, NC is the epitome of a small friendly community. With all the down home charm you would expect from a small NC town.

Hendersonville, North Carolina, is a city in Henderson County. Hendersonville’s population per the 2010 U.S. Census was 13,137.  The estimated population in 2019 was reported by the U.S. Census to be 14,157. Per the U.S. Census, Hendersonville has a total area of 6.94 square miles. Latitude – 35°19′14″N, Longitude –  82°27′42″W. The street delivery zip codes for Hendersonville are 28739, 28791, and 28792. P.O. Box delivery zip codes are 28758 and 28793. The area code for Hendersonville is 828.

Hendersonville is located in Western North Carolina. Hendersonville is roughly 26 miles from downtown Asheville. The city is situated on a plateau of the Blue Ridge Mountains at an elevation of 2,152′ above sea level. Hendersonville was incorporated in 1847. The city, like the county, was named for Leonard Henderson (1772 – 1833), the Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1829 until his death in 1833. Hendersonville is the county seat for Henderson County. 

A brief historical overview of Hendersonville and the surrounding area.

The Henderson County area was inhabited as far back as 12,000 years ago, per historical, archaeological evidence. The first documented inhabitants of the area were the Cherokee Indians. This written historical record derives from the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto’s expedition to the area in 1540. He led the first European expedition of the interior of what would become the United States. The expedition’s primary objective was a land route to China. The secondary objective was a source of gold. 

Beginning in 1539, De Soto’s expedition arrived on the shores near present-day Tampa Bay, Florida. His expedition included around seven hundred men, many of whom were carrying weapons and armor. Others were carrying provisions and trading goods. De Soto’s expedition traveled through the interior of the future United States, bringing a great deal of brutality and carnage with it. This brutality and carnage were directed towards the Native American population in many of the areas they entered.

However, this harsh treatment of Native Americans was not shown towards the Cherokee Indians upon de Soto’s first encounter with these Native Americans. Whatever the reason, possibly de Soto’s reputation for brutality proceeding him, when the expedition reached the first major Cherokee village in the mountains of the future North Carolina, he was immediately offered tribute by the villagers. The tribute was graciously accepted by de Soto, and there was no brutality towards the Cherokee. This date was recorded as May 25, 1540, and was supposedly the first European encounter with the Cherokee people.

Joara was the name of the Cherokee village de Soto came to, and it was located near the modern-day City of Morganton. In the written recordings of De Soto’s expedition, this village is referred to as Xuala, and the Cherokee people are noted as the “Chalaque.” The de Soto expedition departed peacefully the following day.  

The written documentation of De Soto’s expedition comes primarily from four sources. The first being the anonymous work of a man who went by the moniker “Gentleman of Elvas.” The work, True Relation [Relaçam Verdadeira] of the Hardships Suffered by Governor Hernando De Soto & Certain Portuguese Gentlemen During the Discovery of the Providence of Florida, was published in 1557. The anonymous author was supposedly a member of the expedition. The second is a report of the expedition published in 1544 by Luys Hernández de Biedma; he was a member of the expedition, and this work provided much of the supporting documentation used in sequential works on the topic. The third was the diary of Rodrigo Ranjel, de Soto’s secretary. This diary was the basis for Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés’ La historia general y natural de las Indias, published in 1851. The original diary compiled by Ranjel has been lost to history. The fourth documentation source is from oral histories passed down by the Cherokee people. Oral histories have been documented and note this first European and Cherokee meeting in 1540.

John Lederer, a German explorer, was the next to extensively document the Native Americans in the Cherokee Indian region in 1670. His expeditions are documented in The Discoveries of John Lederer, In three several Marches from Virginia, To the West of Carolina, And other parts of the Continent: Begun in March 1669 and ended in September 1670. Lederer is purportedly the first European to crest the Blue Ridge Mountains and view the Shenandoah Valley. 

A consequence of Lederer’s expeditions and writings was the development of European trade between the Cherokee and other Native American tribes. This trading commerce eventually transformed all Native American societies forever. The initial European traders reached the Cherokee territory shortly after Lederer’s expeditions in 1673. James Needham and Gabriel Arthur were supposedly the first traders to reach the Cherokee territory. This trade was based on animal skins or furs, primarily deerskin. The best reference material on the early European traders is, The Travels of James Needham and Gabriel Arthur through Virginia, North Carolina, and Beyond, 1673-1674, edited by R.P. Stephen Davis, Jr. 1990. 

The story goes that in 1673, Needham and Arthur first arrived at a Cherokee village hoping to trade for deerskins and beeswax. These initial trading efforts of Needham and Arthur met with success. However, circumstances changed for the worse, which has now become mountain folklore. Time and the retelling have probably embellished actual events; However, the legendary demise of Needham is worth noting in this blog. Needham, leading a group of Cherokee Indians, met his end on an Indian trail near the Yadkin River by the hands of a Cherokee Indian named Hasecoll. Needham became involved in a heated verbal exchanged with Hasecoll, also known as “Indian John,” in June of 1674. To bring the heated verbal exchange to an end, Indian John shot Needham in the head. Then standing over a dying Needham, Indian John produced a knife and cut open Needham’s chest. Reportedly, Indian John pulled out Needham’s still-beating heart and stood over his body, holding the heart high into the air. Then Indian John supposedly looked defiantly east towards the land of the settled European colonies and proclaimed his contempt for all the settlers to the region and especially Needham.

Along with commerce, the Europeans also exposed Native Americans to new diseases. Smallpox was devastating to the entire Native American population. It is estimated that the smallpox mortality rate for the Cherokee people was at least 50% in the 18th century.  

Settlers encroaching their territory was another problem the Cherokee had to contend with, in addition to the devastating smallpox epidemics and shrinking population. European settlers encroaching in their territory in North Carolina and South Carolina had been a problem for many years. The American Revolution became the tipping point when the Cherokee Indians sided with the British Crown against the Patriots.  

What came of this alliance with the British Crown was the Cherokee War of 1776. This conflict was a bloody Indian uprising against settlers and settlements in both Carolinas and bordering states. At the onset of the American Revolution, the British sought out alliances with Native American tribes to help them suppress the Patriot rebellion. Many of these Native American tribes allied with the British in hopes of preventing settlers from encroaching on their territories. 

Cherokee Indians, with other allying Indian tribes in July of 1776, began raiding settlements with shocking brutality. At first, these raids were concentrated on Appalachian settlements located around the Watauga, Holston, Nolichucky, and Doe rivers within the Washington District. The Washington District is what eventually became western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. The raids soon spread to the surrounding states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia. 

Accounts from this period on the brutality of these raids were horrifying. This horror led to panic among the Patriot population. The victims of these raids were the fortunate ones if they were killed in the initial assault and not captured alive by the Cherokee. Accounts relay stories of those taken alive, subjected to torture, mutilation, and then beaten to death. Once dead, it was reported, the victims were scalped. The raiding party, before departing, would burn any crops and slaughter any livestock. The stories of these raids resulted in most of the population fleeing and taking refuge in the frontier forts. Many of the settlers who did not find refuge in one of the frontier forts sought out retribution from any Native American they could find, which resulted in more innocent victims on both sides of the conflict. 

In response to the ongoing Indian raids, the state militias of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia were marshaled up for punitive actions against the Cherokee Nation and their Native American allies. The state militias had a combined force of around 6,000 men. Each state’s militia was constituting their own force, advanced into the Cherokee territory in a three-prong attack. Some of these militia members were apparently seeking personal retribution for the brutal deaths of family, friends, and neighbors. This is evidenced by the brutal retaliation dealt out to the Cherokee and Native American people that were in the path of these three militias. 

This brutal retaliation may not have been to the degree of brutality of the initial Indian raids, but its scope of severity was disproportionate. Around fifty Native American villages were burned along with all food stores and crops. The resulting death toll for both sides is undetermined, but it is considered to be in the hundreds. Again, there were many innocent victims on both sides of the conflict. The resulting aftermath of the raids was a harsh sentiment towards Native Americans, and many calls for the elimination of the Cherokee Nation. Leading political figures of the time held these same harsh retaliatory sentiments, including Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and John Hancock. 

A general sentiment of the time held by many Patriots was the British had encouraged these raids and encouraged the resulting brutality. The British did seek to ally with Native American tribes in suppressing the rebellion; however, there is no evidence of British direct involvement or encouragement in the degree of brutality exercised upon the raid victims. It is probably safe to say that the brutality of the settler raids was not outside the norm of how Native Americans fought other Native Americans during inter-tribe conflicts during this period. With this being said, no doubt the Cherokee and other Native American tribes obviously believed they were within their rights to repel settlers who had encroached on their territorial lands. There is evidence that the British told Native Americans they had the right to deal with settlers who had encroached on their territory.

The retaliatory attacks by the state militias had the desired effects of reducing the Cherokee and allying Native Americans’ ability to fight and by the beginning of 1777. The Cherokee War of 1776 was largely over with the exception of some Indian holdouts, who became known as the “Chickamauga Cherokee.” The end of the Cherokee hostilities essentially opened the western North Carolina mountain region, the traditional Cherokee Indian territory, to settlers. 

Hendersonville

Hendersonville had a controversial start, with there being a great deal of contention over the county seat location. When Henderson County was formed from part of Buncombe County in 1838, there was a great deal of debate on where to place the county seat. There were two sites in contention, a site near the French Broad River or a site near the Buncombe Turnpike. This controversial issue was finally resolved by a vote of the citizenry of Henderson County in favor of the site near the Buncombe Turnpike. The Buncombe Turnpike was generally where what has become U.S. Highway 25 is today. 

In 1841, the Town of Hendersonville was laid out on a 50-acre tract of land, donated for the most part by Judge Mitchell King. King was a Charleston attorney who owned 1,000 acres. For whatever reason, foresight or no want for land, Main Street was laid out with a width of 100 feet. This wide and broad Main Street at the time of horse and wagon proved well adaptable to the transition to automobiles with 20-foot-wide sidewalks and a 60-feet wide street now dominated by moving and parked cars. Until the onset of automobiles, Main Street was unpaved. Many times, mud made traversing the street difficult for ox-drawn wagons. The homes and businesses along Main Street were provided shade from rows of aspen trees. Hendersonville was chartered by the legislature in 1847.

The first economic driver for Hendersonville was the completion of the Asheville and Greenville Plank Road, the successor of the Buncombe Turnpike,  through the town in the mid-1850s. This road boosted agricultural production by providing a more efficient way for farmers to transport their goods to new markets. It is estimated that 150,000 to 175,000 hogs were herded to market down this road between October and December each year. There was incredible economic growth in the towns and areas around this road. The Asheville and Greenville Plank Road connected with other roads to Kentucky, back down to Charleston.    

The next major economic event for Hendersonville was the completion of the railroad between Spartanburg in 1879. The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad was only 21 miles long but was an economic boost to the area. Unfortunately, and not uncommon for the era, the Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad fell into financial difficulty and eventually had to reorganize as the Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad. As a consequence of this financial difficulty, the railroad did not reach Asheville until 1886. Up until then, citizens of Asheville had to travel to Hendersonville to travel by train.  

After World War I, there was a housing boom in Hendersonville in addition to a population influx. As with many other towns and cities with dwindling tax revenues and fiscal spending responsibilities, Hendersonville was severely affected by the Great Depression (1929 – 1941). Many homes were foreclosed on, along with banks closing. In December of 1935, the City of Hendersonville filed a petition in Federal Court stating that it was “hopelessly insolvent.” The city was seeking relief from a creditor’s lawsuit in a bond default of almost $600,000. The neighboring City of Asheville’s municipal financial situation was by far worse. Asheville did not pay off its depression financial obligations until the 1970s. However, the City of Hendersonville’s financial condition was considered resolved by the early 1940s.

Hendersonville has the traditional small-town Main Street with restaurants and retail shops. The traditional architecture found in downtown Hendersonville represents the late 19th century. 

Hendersonville was one of the first towns in Western North Carolina that was a tourist destination. This tourist influx reportedly goes back to as early as 1830, before Hendersonville was even incorporated. These early tourists were primarily the wealthy escaping the oppressive heat of Charleston. These South Carolina lowlanders traveled to Flat Rock south of Hendersonville for the summer and returned home for the winter. Over time many of these lowlanders established year-round homes and became permanent residents of the Hendersonville area.   

For the majority of the 20th century, Hendersonville had a diverse and balanced economy. However, tourism still dominated the economy, with industry and agriculture making up a large part of the remaining economy. Until the 1970s, tourism was roughly 50% of the economy, with industry and agriculture making up roughly 25% each. During the 1970s, tourism became a larger part of the economy. Today tourism has around a $325 million annual impact. More than 2,000 jobs are tied to tourism in Hendersonville and the surrounding area. 

From the beginning of the 20th century up until the 1970s, textile manufacturing played a major role in the industrial base. Agriculture was diversified on crop cultivation, but apple production seems to have been a constant choice for cultivation for over a hundred years. The North Carolina Apple Festival is a major attraction to the city and starts on the Friday before Labor Day and runs through that Monday each year.

Many factors have attracted people to move to Hendersonville. The small-town atmosphere and the mild summer climate, typically in the 70s, are a big draw. U.S. Interstate 26 to the east of the city makes it a quick drive to Asheville. The convenient highway system to Asheville, the largest city in the area, allows both commuters and others who wish quick access to a larger city while still living in a small town. 

Hendersonville has always been a beacon for creative people, writers, artists, and musicians. Theater and drama played a large part in the social life of Hendersonville. The Hendersonville Little Theater, now known as the Hendersonville Community Theatre, in 1951 had over 350 members and produced four plays during its fall and winter season. The now Hendersonville Community Theatre is very active and always presents quality entertainment. Their website is https://www.hendersonvillecommunitytheatre.org/

Music and concerts have played a large part in the lives of the citizenry and with tourists for well over a hundred years. There used to be a Romanesque-style Opera House at 424 N. Main Street. The Opera House had varying performances genre up to reportedly showing the first motion picture in town. The concert series “Music on Main” held in downtown Hendersonville during the summer months is extremely popular. The concert’s music variety ranges from oldies to contemporary and the concerts are free to attend. A popular antique car show, sponsored by the Carolina Mountain Car Club, is held at the same time as these concerts at Barnwell and Caswell streets.

Notable People, Places, & Events in Hendersonville and Surrounding Area:

  • In 1888, a steam-powered “street railway” with railway cars ran between the newly founded Laurel Park and Hendersonville. This “street railway” of roughly two miles operated for a number of years before the prevalence of automobiles.
  • Telephone service finally arrived in Hendersonville on May 30, 1899. The first telephone call originated from telephone number “19,” the Asheville Milling company in Hendersonville, from Mr. Barber to the Asheville Citizen-Times in Asheville. From the newspaper report, “The phone sounded very clear, and if he had not said he was at Hendersonville, one would have thought he was near the square.”     
  • At one time, logging was a major industry in Henderson County and the surrounding counties. From the late 1800s into the early 1900s, clear-cut logging left much of the land in Henderson County and much of Western North Carolina void of trees.  
  • In April of 1903, R.M. Oates completed the installation of Hendersonville’s first power plant in a stone building that was located at the corner of N. Main Street and 7th Avenue West. The first electrical subscribers totaled fifty-three homes and business establishments. 
  • The Kentucky Home hotel in 1916, a well-known hotel in Hendersonville, became the third hotel in town to install steam heat in each room. The other two hotels, the Park Hill and the Carolina Terrace, had just recently installed steam heat in all the rooms as well. Installing steam heat in every room allowed all three hotels to remain open during the cold winter months. With the heating upgrade at the Kentucky Home along with the other two main hotels in town, this was hailed at the time as the beginning of Hendersonville becoming a winter resort destination. 
  • The famous poet, biographer, and goat-raiser, Carl Sandburg calls nearby Flat Rock home. Sandburg moved to a 246-acre farm, Connemara, in Flat Rock in 1945. He worked and lived there with his wife, daughters, and two grandchildren. Sandburg wrote over a third of his published work there and died there in 1967 at age 89.
  • Hendersonville has two popular monikers, the traditional “City of Four Seasons” and the trendier moniker of “Hendo.”

Historic Henderson Population Per the U.S. Census

1860 1,740 —

1870 278 −84.0%

1880 554 99.3%

1890 1,216 119.5%

1900 1,917 57.6%

1910 2,818 47.0%

1920 3,729 32.3%

1930 5,070 36.0%

1940 5,381 6.1%

1950 6,103 13.4%

1960 5,911 −3.1%

1970 6,443 9.0%

1980 6,862 6.5%

1990 7,284 6.1%

2000 10,420 43.1%

2010 13,137 26.1%

2019 14,157(est.) 7.8%

Per the U.S. Census Bureau: 

Population per 2010 Census: 13,121

Male population: 41.9%

Female population: 58.1%

Population under 18 years: 16.8%

Population 65 years & over: 32.3%

High school graduate or higher 2015-2019: 91.2%

Bachelor’s degree or higher 2015-2019: 35.6%

Median home value 2015-2019: $188,100

Owner-occupied: 42.6%  

Total households 2015-2019: 7,274

There were 1,946 businesses or firms within the City of Hendersonville as of the 2012 U.S. Census.

If you are looking for full-service community association management contact our team at (828) 692-7742 or click here to request a proposal. We look forward to discussing with you how we can bring the best to your community.

Hendersonville Office
1509 Haywood Rd Suite C
Hendersonville, NC 28791
(828) 692-7742

Hendersonville

HOA MANAGEMENT SERVICES IN HENDERSONVILLE, NC

Hendersonville, NC is the epitome of a small friendly community. With all the down home charm you would expect from a small NC town.

Hendersonville, North Carolina, is a city in Henderson County. Hendersonville’s population per the 2010 U.S. Census was 13,137.  The estimated population in 2019 was reported by the U.S. Census to be 14,157. Per the U.S. Census, Hendersonville has a total area of 6.94 square miles. Latitude – 35°19′14″N, Longitude –  82°27′42″W. The street delivery zip codes for Hendersonville are 28739, 28791, and 28792. P.O. Box delivery zip codes are 28758 and 28793. The area code for Hendersonville is 828.

Hendersonville is located in Western North Carolina. Hendersonville is roughly 26 miles from downtown Asheville. The city is situated on a plateau of the Blue Ridge Mountains at an elevation of 2,152′ above sea level. Hendersonville was incorporated in 1847. The city, like the county, was named for Leonard Henderson (1772 – 1833), the Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1829 until his death in 1833. Hendersonville is the county seat for Henderson County. 

A brief historical overview of Hendersonville and the surrounding area.

The Henderson County area was inhabited as far back as 12,000 years ago, per historical, archaeological evidence. The first documented inhabitants of the area were the Cherokee Indians. This written historical record derives from the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto’s expedition to the area in 1540. He led the first European expedition of the interior of what would become the United States. The expedition’s primary objective was a land route to China. The secondary objective was a source of gold. 

Beginning in 1539, De Soto’s expedition arrived on the shores near present-day Tampa Bay, Florida. His expedition included around seven hundred men, many of whom were carrying weapons and armor. Others were carrying provisions and trading goods. De Soto’s expedition traveled through the interior of the future United States, bringing a great deal of brutality and carnage with it. This brutality and carnage were directed towards the Native American population in many of the areas they entered.

However, this harsh treatment of Native Americans was not shown towards the Cherokee Indians upon de Soto’s first encounter with these Native Americans. Whatever the reason, possibly de Soto’s reputation for brutality proceeding him, when the expedition reached the first major Cherokee village in the mountains of the future North Carolina, he was immediately offered tribute by the villagers. The tribute was graciously accepted by de Soto, and there was no brutality towards the Cherokee. This date was recorded as May 25, 1540, and was supposedly the first European encounter with the Cherokee people.

Joara was the name of the Cherokee village de Soto came to, and it was located near the modern-day City of Morganton. In the written recordings of De Soto’s expedition, this village is referred to as Xuala, and the Cherokee people are noted as the “Chalaque.” The de Soto expedition departed peacefully the following day.  

The written documentation of De Soto’s expedition comes primarily from four sources. The first being the anonymous work of a man who went by the moniker “Gentleman of Elvas.” The work, True Relation [Relaçam Verdadeira] of the Hardships Suffered by Governor Hernando De Soto & Certain Portuguese Gentlemen During the Discovery of the Providence of Florida, was published in 1557. The anonymous author was supposedly a member of the expedition. The second is a report of the expedition published in 1544 by Luys Hernández de Biedma; he was a member of the expedition, and this work provided much of the supporting documentation used in sequential works on the topic. The third was the diary of Rodrigo Ranjel, de Soto’s secretary. This diary was the basis for Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés’ La historia general y natural de las Indias, published in 1851. The original diary compiled by Ranjel has been lost to history. The fourth documentation source is from oral histories passed down by the Cherokee people. Oral histories have been documented and note this first European and Cherokee meeting in 1540.

John Lederer, a German explorer, was the next to extensively document the Native Americans in the Cherokee Indian region in 1670. His expeditions are documented in The Discoveries of John Lederer, In three several Marches from Virginia, To the West of Carolina, And other parts of the Continent: Begun in March 1669 and ended in September 1670. Lederer is purportedly the first European to crest the Blue Ridge Mountains and view the Shenandoah Valley. 

A consequence of Lederer’s expeditions and writings was the development of European trade between the Cherokee and other Native American tribes. This trading commerce eventually transformed all Native American societies forever. The initial European traders reached the Cherokee territory shortly after Lederer’s expeditions in 1673. James Needham and Gabriel Arthur were supposedly the first traders to reach the Cherokee territory. This trade was based on animal skins or furs, primarily deerskin. The best reference material on the early European traders is, The Travels of James Needham and Gabriel Arthur through Virginia, North Carolina, and Beyond, 1673-1674, edited by R.P. Stephen Davis, Jr. 1990. 

The story goes that in 1673, Needham and Arthur first arrived at a Cherokee village hoping to trade for deerskins and beeswax. These initial trading efforts of Needham and Arthur met with success. However, circumstances changed for the worse, which has now become mountain folklore. Time and the retelling have probably embellished actual events; However, the legendary demise of Needham is worth noting in this blog. Needham, leading a group of Cherokee Indians, met his end on an Indian trail near the Yadkin River by the hands of a Cherokee Indian named Hasecoll. Needham became involved in a heated verbal exchanged with Hasecoll, also known as “Indian John,” in June of 1674. To bring the heated verbal exchange to an end, Indian John shot Needham in the head. Then standing over a dying Needham, Indian John produced a knife and cut open Needham’s chest. Reportedly, Indian John pulled out Needham’s still-beating heart and stood over his body, holding the heart high into the air. Then Indian John supposedly looked defiantly east towards the land of the settled European colonies and proclaimed his contempt for all the settlers to the region and especially Needham.

Along with commerce, the Europeans also exposed Native Americans to new diseases. Smallpox was devastating to the entire Native American population. It is estimated that the smallpox mortality rate for the Cherokee people was at least 50% in the 18th century.  

Settlers encroaching their territory was another problem the Cherokee had to contend with, in addition to the devastating smallpox epidemics and shrinking population. European settlers encroaching in their territory in North Carolina and South Carolina had been a problem for many years. The American Revolution became the tipping point when the Cherokee Indians sided with the British Crown against the Patriots.  

What came of this alliance with the British Crown was the Cherokee War of 1776. This conflict was a bloody Indian uprising against settlers and settlements in both Carolinas and bordering states. At the onset of the American Revolution, the British sought out alliances with Native American tribes to help them suppress the Patriot rebellion. Many of these Native American tribes allied with the British in hopes of preventing settlers from encroaching on their territories. 

Cherokee Indians, with other allying Indian tribes in July of 1776, began raiding settlements with shocking brutality. At first, these raids were concentrated on Appalachian settlements located around the Watauga, Holston, Nolichucky, and Doe rivers within the Washington District. The Washington District is what eventually became western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. The raids soon spread to the surrounding states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia. 

Accounts from this period on the brutality of these raids were horrifying. This horror led to panic among the Patriot population. The victims of these raids were the fortunate ones if they were killed in the initial assault and not captured alive by the Cherokee. Accounts relay stories of those taken alive, subjected to torture, mutilation, and then beaten to death. Once dead, it was reported, the victims were scalped. The raiding party, before departing, would burn any crops and slaughter any livestock. The stories of these raids resulted in most of the population fleeing and taking refuge in the frontier forts. Many of the settlers who did not find refuge in one of the frontier forts sought out retribution from any Native American they could find, which resulted in more innocent victims on both sides of the conflict. 

In response to the ongoing Indian raids, the state militias of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia were marshaled up for punitive actions against the Cherokee Nation and their Native American allies. The state militias had a combined force of around 6,000 men. Each state’s militia was constituting their own force, advanced into the Cherokee territory in a three-prong attack. Some of these militia members were apparently seeking personal retribution for the brutal deaths of family, friends, and neighbors. This is evidenced by the brutal retaliation dealt out to the Cherokee and Native American people that were in the path of these three militias. 

This brutal retaliation may not have been to the degree of brutality of the initial Indian raids, but its scope of severity was disproportionate. Around fifty Native American villages were burned along with all food stores and crops. The resulting death toll for both sides is undetermined, but it is considered to be in the hundreds. Again, there were many innocent victims on both sides of the conflict. The resulting aftermath of the raids was a harsh sentiment towards Native Americans, and many calls for the elimination of the Cherokee Nation. Leading political figures of the time held these same harsh retaliatory sentiments, including Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and John Hancock. 

A general sentiment of the time held by many Patriots was the British had encouraged these raids and encouraged the resulting brutality. The British did seek to ally with Native American tribes in suppressing the rebellion; however, there is no evidence of British direct involvement or encouragement in the degree of brutality exercised upon the raid victims. It is probably safe to say that the brutality of the settler raids was not outside the norm of how Native Americans fought other Native Americans during inter-tribe conflicts during this period. With this being said, no doubt the Cherokee and other Native American tribes obviously believed they were within their rights to repel settlers who had encroached on their territorial lands. There is evidence that the British told Native Americans they had the right to deal with settlers who had encroached on their territory.

The retaliatory attacks by the state militias had the desired effects of reducing the Cherokee and allying Native Americans’ ability to fight and by the beginning of 1777. The Cherokee War of 1776 was largely over with the exception of some Indian holdouts, who became known as the “Chickamauga Cherokee.” The end of the Cherokee hostilities essentially opened the western North Carolina mountain region, the traditional Cherokee Indian territory, to settlers. 

Hendersonville

Hendersonville had a controversial start, with there being a great deal of contention over the county seat location. When Henderson County was formed from part of Buncombe County in 1838, there was a great deal of debate on where to place the county seat. There were two sites in contention, a site near the French Broad River or a site near the Buncombe Turnpike. This controversial issue was finally resolved by a vote of the citizenry of Henderson County in favor of the site near the Buncombe Turnpike. The Buncombe Turnpike was generally where what has become U.S. Highway 25 is today. 

In 1841, the Town of Hendersonville was laid out on a 50-acre tract of land, donated for the most part by Judge Mitchell King. King was a Charleston attorney who owned 1,000 acres. For whatever reason, foresight or no want for land, Main Street was laid out with a width of 100 feet. This wide and broad Main Street at the time of horse and wagon proved well adaptable to the transition to automobiles with 20-foot-wide sidewalks and a 60-feet wide street now dominated by moving and parked cars. Until the onset of automobiles, Main Street was unpaved. Many times, mud made traversing the street difficult for ox-drawn wagons. The homes and businesses along Main Street were provided shade from rows of aspen trees. Hendersonville was chartered by the legislature in 1847.

The first economic driver for Hendersonville was the completion of the Asheville and Greenville Plank Road, the successor of the Buncombe Turnpike,  through the town in the mid-1850s. This road boosted agricultural production by providing a more efficient way for farmers to transport their goods to new markets. It is estimated that 150,000 to 175,000 hogs were herded to market down this road between October and December each year. There was incredible economic growth in the towns and areas around this road. The Asheville and Greenville Plank Road connected with other roads to Kentucky, back down to Charleston.    

The next major economic event for Hendersonville was the completion of the railroad between Spartanburg in 1879. The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad was only 21 miles long but was an economic boost to the area. Unfortunately, and not uncommon for the era, the Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad fell into financial difficulty and eventually had to reorganize as the Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad. As a consequence of this financial difficulty, the railroad did not reach Asheville until 1886. Up until then, citizens of Asheville had to travel to Hendersonville to travel by train.  

After World War I, there was a housing boom in Hendersonville in addition to a population influx. As with many other towns and cities with dwindling tax revenues and fiscal spending responsibilities, Hendersonville was severely affected by the Great Depression (1929 – 1941). Many homes were foreclosed on, along with banks closing. In December of 1935, the City of Hendersonville filed a petition in Federal Court stating that it was “hopelessly insolvent.” The city was seeking relief from a creditor’s lawsuit in a bond default of almost $600,000. The neighboring City of Asheville’s municipal financial situation was by far worse. Asheville did not pay off its depression financial obligations until the 1970s. However, the City of Hendersonville’s financial condition was considered resolved by the early 1940s.

Hendersonville has the traditional small-town Main Street with restaurants and retail shops. The traditional architecture found in downtown Hendersonville represents the late 19th century. 

Hendersonville was one of the first towns in Western North Carolina that was a tourist destination. This tourist influx reportedly goes back to as early as 1830, before Hendersonville was even incorporated. These early tourists were primarily the wealthy escaping the oppressive heat of Charleston. These South Carolina lowlanders traveled to Flat Rock south of Hendersonville for the summer and returned home for the winter. Over time many of these lowlanders established year-round homes and became permanent residents of the Hendersonville area.   

For the majority of the 20th century, Hendersonville had a diverse and balanced economy. However, tourism still dominated the economy, with industry and agriculture making up a large part of the remaining economy. Until the 1970s, tourism was roughly 50% of the economy, with industry and agriculture making up roughly 25% each. During the 1970s, tourism became a larger part of the economy. Today tourism has around a $325 million annual impact. More than 2,000 jobs are tied to tourism in Hendersonville and the surrounding area. 

From the beginning of the 20th century up until the 1970s, textile manufacturing played a major role in the industrial base. Agriculture was diversified on crop cultivation, but apple production seems to have been a constant choice for cultivation for over a hundred years. The North Carolina Apple Festival is a major attraction to the city and starts on the Friday before Labor Day and runs through that Monday each year.

Many factors have attracted people to move to Hendersonville. The small-town atmosphere and the mild summer climate, typically in the 70s, are a big draw. U.S. Interstate 26 to the east of the city makes it a quick drive to Asheville. The convenient highway system to Asheville, the largest city in the area, allows both commuters and others who wish quick access to a larger city while still living in a small town. 

Hendersonville has always been a beacon for creative people, writers, artists, and musicians. Theater and drama played a large part in the social life of Hendersonville. The Hendersonville Little Theater, now known as the Hendersonville Community Theatre, in 1951 had over 350 members and produced four plays during its fall and winter season. The now Hendersonville Community Theatre is very active and always presents quality entertainment. Their website is https://www.hendersonvillecommunitytheatre.org/

Music and concerts have played a large part in the lives of the citizenry and with tourists for well over a hundred years. There used to be a Romanesque-style Opera House at 424 N. Main Street. The Opera House had varying performances genre up to reportedly showing the first motion picture in town. The concert series “Music on Main” held in downtown Hendersonville during the summer months is extremely popular. The concert’s music variety ranges from oldies to contemporary and the concerts are free to attend. A popular antique car show, sponsored by the Carolina Mountain Car Club, is held at the same time as these concerts at Barnwell and Caswell streets.

Notable People, Places, & Events in Hendersonville and Surrounding Area:

  • In 1888, a steam-powered “street railway” with railway cars ran between the newly founded Laurel Park and Hendersonville. This “street railway” of roughly two miles operated for a number of years before the prevalence of automobiles.
  • Telephone service finally arrived in Hendersonville on May 30, 1899. The first telephone call originated from telephone number “19,” the Asheville Milling company in Hendersonville, from Mr. Barber to the Asheville Citizen-Times in Asheville. From the newspaper report, “The phone sounded very clear, and if he had not said he was at Hendersonville, one would have thought he was near the square.”     
  • At one time, logging was a major industry in Henderson County and the surrounding counties. From the late 1800s into the early 1900s, clear-cut logging left much of the land in Henderson County and much of Western North Carolina void of trees.  
  • In April of 1903, R.M. Oates completed the installation of Hendersonville’s first power plant in a stone building that was located at the corner of N. Main Street and 7th Avenue West. The first electrical subscribers totaled fifty-three homes and business establishments. 
  • The Kentucky Home hotel in 1916, a well-known hotel in Hendersonville, became the third hotel in town to install steam heat in each room. The other two hotels, the Park Hill and the Carolina Terrace, had just recently installed steam heat in all the rooms as well. Installing steam heat in every room allowed all three hotels to remain open during the cold winter months. With the heating upgrade at the Kentucky Home along with the other two main hotels in town, this was hailed at the time as the beginning of Hendersonville becoming a winter resort destination. 
  • The famous poet, biographer, and goat-raiser, Carl Sandburg calls nearby Flat Rock home. Sandburg moved to a 246-acre farm, Connemara, in Flat Rock in 1945. He worked and lived there with his wife, daughters, and two grandchildren. Sandburg wrote over a third of his published work there and died there in 1967 at age 89.
  • Hendersonville has two popular monikers, the traditional “City of Four Seasons” and the trendier moniker of “Hendo.”

Historic Henderson Population Per the U.S. Census

1860 1,740 —

1870 278 −84.0%

1880 554 99.3%

1890 1,216 119.5%

1900 1,917 57.6%

1910 2,818 47.0%

1920 3,729 32.3%

1930 5,070 36.0%

1940 5,381 6.1%

1950 6,103 13.4%

1960 5,911 −3.1%

1970 6,443 9.0%

1980 6,862 6.5%

1990 7,284 6.1%

2000 10,420 43.1%

2010 13,137 26.1%

2019 14,157(est.) 7.8%

Per the U.S. Census Bureau: 

Population per 2010 Census: 13,121

Male population: 41.9%

Female population: 58.1%

Population under 18 years: 16.8%

Population 65 years & over: 32.3%

High school graduate or higher 2015-2019: 91.2%

Bachelor’s degree or higher 2015-2019: 35.6%

Median home value 2015-2019: $188,100

Owner-occupied: 42.6%  

Total households 2015-2019: 7,274

There were 1,946 businesses or firms within the City of Hendersonville as of the 2012 U.S. Census.

If you are looking for full-service community association management contact our team at (828) 692-7742 or click here to request a proposal. We look forward to discussing with you how we can bring the best to your community.

Hendersonville Office
1509 Haywood Rd Suite C
Hendersonville, NC 28791
(828) 692-7742