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Indian Trail

Indian Trail, North Carolina, or the Town of Indian Trail, is located in Union County. Indian Trail is a suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina, and is around 16 miles from uptown Charlotte. Indian Trail, in the last twenty years or so, has grown into a bedroom community for Charlotte. The population of Indian Trail in the 1990 U.S. Census was 1,942, and the estimated 2019 U.S. Census population was calculated at 40,252. Indian Trail’s town motto is “Crossing Paths.” This motto alludes to the long history of Native American and European traders who traveled through their community for hundreds of years.

William Douglas Property Management is proud to offer HOA Management and Association Management services in Indian Trail, NC

Indian Trail’s zip code is 28079. Zipcodes 28110, 28104, 28105 are also in use within Indian Trail.

The area code for Indian Trail is 704.

The land area of Indian Trail per the U.S. Census 2010 is 21.69 square miles.

Population per square mile per the U.S. Census 2010 is 1,545.4.

Per Google Earth – Location/Coordinates: Latitude: 35°05′34.73″N, Longitude: 80°36′59.42″W

Union County was established in 1842 from an eastern part of Mecklenburg County and a western part of Anson county. Named in honor of President James Monroe, the county seat Monroe, or the City of Monroe, was established in 1843. 

The first census for Union County was the 1850 U.S. Census, and the population was calculated at 10,051. In one hundred and sixty years, the Union County 2010 U.S. Census calculation the population at 201,292. The 2019 U.S. Census-estimated population for Union County was 244,562.

Indian Trai is situated in the western part of Union County, with the community of Weddington to the southwest, the community of Stallings to the North, and the community of Monroe to the southeast, and the community of Wesley Chapel to the south.

Indian Trail, A Brief Historical Overview

There is a long and rich history in Indian Trail and the surrounding area. There is archeological evidence of Native Americans inhabiting the area for thousands of years. There is documentary evidence of the future Indian Trail area being inhabited by both Catawba and Waxhaw Indians. However, there is historical debate on whether the Waxhaw Indians were actually a distinctively separate tribe from the Catawba Indians or just a band of the Catawba people. This discussion is centered around the similarity in the Catawba and Waxhaw’s language and customs. Both shared a Siouan-based language, but both practiced a distinctive custom of intentionally flattening their foreheads. The custom resulted in setting the eyes of the Waxhaw and Catawba people abnormally further apart with a sloping forehead. This distinctive deformity custom was accomplished by binding infants to boards shortly after birth. Both the Waxhaws and Catawbas lived within highly structured settlements and covered their individual dwellings within the settlement with tree bark. 

If the Waxhaw people who inhabited the future Indian Trail area were a distinct Native American people, they were no longer a separate tribe after the early 1700s. Noted Native American historian James Mooney in his work “The Aboriginal Population of America North of Mexico,” published by the Smithsonian Institute in 1928, estimated the Waxhaw and Sugeree Indian’s population at 1,200 in the year 1600 (The Sugeree people were a Native America tribe closely associated with the Catawba Indians whose territory was in the same general area of the Waxhaw people.). Mooney noted in this work that by 1907, the remaining members of these tribes had integrated with other larger Native American tribes. 

Smallpox introduced by European explorers and traders to Native Americans devastated their population. The Native American people were hit especially hard due to the fact they had not built up any natural immunities to these European diseases. Another factor that hastened the decline of the Native American population was the uprisings against the colonists and intertribal conflicts. One such uprising was the Yamasee War. 

The Yamasee War (1715-1717) was a conflict between the Yamasee Indians and European settlers. This conflict was primarily waged in South Carolina; however, Native Americans in the surrounding American colonies were drawn in and suffered extreme consequences. The origin of the conflict revolved around trading, especially the illegal slave trade of Native Americans, between the Native Americans and the colonist. The Waxhaw Indians allied with the Yamasee Indians along with around a dozen other Native American tribes. The conflict came close to wiping out all the settlers who did not flee to Charles Town (Charleston, South Carolina). In the Native American allied raids against the colonist, purportedly over 400 colonists were killed, along with farms, crops, and settlements being burned. The conflict turned when the Native Americans were unable to resupply with gunpowder and arms because the colonial governments embargoed the trade of these items with Native Americans. An undetermined number of Native Americans died in the conflict or as an aftermath of the conflict.   

The consequences of the Yamasee War were widespread and deep. There is historical debate on what exactly happened to the surviving Waxhaw people. The survivors possibly could have merged into the Yamasee or Cheraw tribes. Whatever the case may be, the Waxhaw Indians, as a distinct tribe, if they were actually distinct from the Catawba people, were considered extinct after the conclusion of the Yamasee War in 1717.

The Town of Indian Trail’s name originates from the Indian trail that passed through the community. This Indian trail was a part of the “Great Trading Path” or the “Occaneechi Path.” The Great Trading Path originated at Fort Henry, Virginia (present-day Petersburg, Virginia) and concluded at Augusta (present-day Georgia) trading post. Before European colonization of North America, the trail was believed to have been more of a succession of short footpaths between Native American villages in the Piedmont region of the Carolina colony. With the beginning of the fur trade in the 1670s between European traders and the Catawba, Cherokee, and other Siouan tribes, these scattered footpaths developed into a major route of commerce. Fur traders would head out loaded with trade goods such as cloth, firearms, tools, alcohol, and trinkets. They would return loaded with animal furs, primarily deer skins, for export to Europe. Because of the many twists and turns and the secondary offshoot trails, no one knows the exact length of the Great Trading Path, but it is estimated to have been around 500 miles long.    

As more European settlers entered the region in the early 1700s, the Great Trading Path slowly became less relevant as points of civilization and more roads developed throughout the Carolina colony. The first European settlers arrived in the future Indian Trail area in the early 1700s. These early immigrants were primarily German Palatines (also known as Pennsylvania Dutch) and Scot-Irish. Between the 1740s and 1760s, European immigrants began arriving in greater numbers to the Union County and future Indian Trail area. These settlers mostly arrived down the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia. The left fork of the Great Wagon Road (The branch of the road that led to Augusta, Georgia, via Lancaster and Camden, South Carolina.) was around 15 miles west of Indian Trail. These new arrivals, for the most part, were subsistence farmers with a few tradesmen. 

The Carolina Central Railway was constructed through Indian Trail and was in service by the end of 1874, from Wilmington, North Carolina, to Charlotte, North Carolina. At a later date, this train service would be extended to a final destination of Shelby, North Carolina. When this happened, the Shelby stop was #37 and totaled 242 miles of rail line from Wilmington. Indian Trail was stop #27, and it was a big stop for the economic development of Indian Trail. Up to this point, the railroad became the largest economic driver for the area. The railroad provided farmers with a more economical and efficient way to deliver their products to new markets. Agriculture being the economic base of the area since the early settlers, was greatly enhanced by the railroad. The railroad allowed for the cultivation of cash crops that boosted the economic conditions of the area population. Cash crops being crops raised specifically to sell and not consume. The Carolina Central Railway line was laid down through the center of Indian Trail and is still there today.

On March 4, 1907, the North Carolina Legislature incorporated Indian Trail as a town. The original town limits were set at a one-half mile radius of the railroad tracks located at Indian Trail Road. The first U.S. Census of Indian Trail was in 1910, and the population calculation came to 154 citizens. The original town limits of one-half mile radius have now grown to town limits of 21.69 square miles and an estimated 2019 population of 40,252.

Copyright © 2021 William Douglas Management, Inc.

Indian Trail

Indian Trail, North Carolina, or the Town of Indian Trail, is located in Union County. Indian Trail is a suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina, and is around 16 miles from uptown Charlotte. Indian Trail, in the last twenty years or so, has grown into a bedroom community for Charlotte. The population of Indian Trail in the 1990 U.S. Census was 1,942, and the estimated 2019 U.S. Census population was calculated at 40,252. Indian Trail’s town motto is “Crossing Paths.” This motto alludes to the long history of Native American and European traders who traveled through their community for hundreds of years.

William Douglas Property Management is proud to offer HOA Management and Association Management services in Indian Trail, NC

Indian Trail’s zip code is 28079. Zipcodes 28110, 28104, 28105 are also in use within Indian Trail.

The area code for Indian Trail is 704.

The land area of Indian Trail per the U.S. Census 2010 is 21.69 square miles.

Population per square mile per the U.S. Census 2010 is 1,545.4.

Per Google Earth – Location/Coordinates: Latitude: 35°05′34.73″N, Longitude: 80°36′59.42″W

Union County was established in 1842 from an eastern part of Mecklenburg County and a western part of Anson county. Named in honor of President James Monroe, the county seat Monroe, or the City of Monroe, was established in 1843.

The first census for Union County was the 1850 U.S. Census, and the population was calculated at 10,051. In one hundred and sixty years, the Union County 2010 U.S. Census calculation the population at 201,292. The 2019 U.S. Census-estimated population for Union County was 244,562.

Indian Trai is situated in the western part of Union County, with the community of Weddington to the southwest, the community of Stallings to the North, and the community of Monroe to the southeast, and the community of Wesley Chapel to the south.

Indian Trail, A Brief Historical Overview

There is a long and rich history in Indian Trail and the surrounding area. There is archeological evidence of Native Americans inhabiting the area for thousands of years. There is documentary evidence of the future Indian Trail area being inhabited by both Catawba and Waxhaw Indians. However, there is historical debate on whether the Waxhaw Indians were actually a distinctively separate tribe from the Catawba Indians or just a band of the Catawba people. This discussion is centered around the similarity in the Catawba and Waxhaw’s language and customs. Both shared a Siouan-based language, but both practiced a distinctive custom of intentionally flattening their foreheads. The custom resulted in setting the eyes of the Waxhaw and Catawba people abnormally further apart with a sloping forehead. This distinctive deformity custom was accomplished by binding infants to boards shortly after birth. Both the Waxhaws and Catawbas lived within highly structured settlements and covered their individual dwellings within the settlement with tree bark.

If the Waxhaw people who inhabited the future Indian Trail area were a distinct Native American people, they were no longer a separate tribe after the early 1700s. Noted Native American historian James Mooney in his work “The Aboriginal Population of America North of Mexico,” published by the Smithsonian Institute in 1928, estimated the Waxhaw and Sugeree Indian’s population at 1,200 in the year 1600 (The Sugeree people were a Native America tribe closely associated with the Catawba Indians whose territory was in the same general area of the Waxhaw people.). Mooney noted in this work that by 1907, the remaining members of these tribes had integrated with other larger Native American tribes.

Smallpox introduced by European explorers and traders to Native Americans devastated their population. The Native American people were hit especially hard due to the fact they had not built up any natural immunities to these European diseases. Another factor that hastened the decline of the Native American population was the uprisings against the colonists and intertribal conflicts. One such uprising was the Yamasee War.

The Yamasee War (1715-1717) was a conflict between the Yamasee Indians and European settlers. This conflict was primarily waged in South Carolina; however, Native Americans in the surrounding American colonies were drawn in and suffered extreme consequences. The origin of the conflict revolved around trading, especially the illegal slave trade of Native Americans, between the Native Americans and the colonist. The Waxhaw Indians allied with the Yamasee Indians along with around a dozen other Native American tribes. The conflict came close to wiping out all the settlers who did not flee to Charles Town (Charleston, South Carolina). In the Native American allied raids against the colonist, purportedly over 400 colonists were killed, along with farms, crops, and settlements being burned. The conflict turned when the Native Americans were unable to resupply with gunpowder and arms because the colonial governments embargoed the trade of these items with Native Americans. An undetermined number of Native Americans died in the conflict or as an aftermath of the conflict.   

The consequences of the Yamasee War were widespread and deep. There is historical debate on what exactly happened to the surviving Waxhaw people. The survivors possibly could have merged into the Yamasee or Cheraw tribes. Whatever the case may be, the Waxhaw Indians, as a distinct tribe, if they were actually distinct from the Catawba people, were considered extinct after the conclusion of the Yamasee War in 1717.

The Town of Indian Trail’s name originates from the Indian trail that passed through the community. This Indian trail was a part of the “Great Trading Path” or the “Occaneechi Path.” The Great Trading Path originated at Fort Henry, Virginia (present-day Petersburg, Virginia) and concluded at Augusta (present-day Georgia) trading post. Before European colonization of North America, the trail was believed to have been more of a succession of short footpaths between Native American villages in the Piedmont region of the Carolina colony. With the beginning of the fur trade in the 1670s between European traders and the Catawba, Cherokee, and other Siouan tribes, these scattered footpaths developed into a major route of commerce. Fur traders would head out loaded with trade goods such as cloth, firearms, tools, alcohol, and trinkets. They would return loaded with animal furs, primarily deer skins, for export to Europe. Because of the many twists and turns and the secondary offshoot trails, no one knows the exact length of the Great Trading Path, but it is estimated to have been around 500 miles long.    

As more European settlers entered the region in the early 1700s, the Great Trading Path slowly became less relevant as points of civilization and more roads developed throughout the Carolina colony. The first European settlers arrived in the future Indian Trail area in the early 1700s. These early immigrants were primarily German Palatines (also known as Pennsylvania Dutch) and Scot-Irish. Between the 1740s and 1760s, European immigrants began arriving in greater numbers to the Union County and future Indian Trail area. These settlers mostly arrived down the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia. The left fork of the Great Wagon Road (The branch of the road that led to Augusta, Georgia, via Lancaster and Camden, South Carolina.) was around 15 miles west of Indian Trail. These new arrivals, for the most part, were subsistence farmers with a few tradesmen.

The Carolina Central Railway was constructed through Indian Trail and was in service by the end of 1874, from Wilmington, North Carolina, to Charlotte, North Carolina. At a later date, this train service would be extended to a final destination of Shelby, North Carolina. When this happened, the Shelby stop was #37 and totaled 242 miles of rail line from Wilmington. Indian Trail was stop #27, and it was a big stop for the economic development of Indian Trail. Up to this point, the railroad became the largest economic driver for the area. The railroad provided farmers with a more economical and efficient way to deliver their products to new markets. Agriculture being the economic base of the area since the early settlers, was greatly enhanced by the railroad. The railroad allowed for the cultivation of cash crops that boosted the economic conditions of the area population. Cash crops being crops raised specifically to sell and not consume. The Carolina Central Railway line was laid down through the center of Indian Trail and is still there today.

On March 4, 1907, the North Carolina Legislature incorporated Indian Trail as a town. The original town limits were set at a one-half mile radius of the railroad tracks located at Indian Trail Road. The first U.S. Census of Indian Trail was in 1910, and the population calculation came to 154 citizens. The original town limits of one-half mile radius have now grown to town limits of 21.69 square miles and an estimated 2019 population of 40,252.

Copyright © 2021 William Douglas Management, Inc.

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