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William Douglas Property Management offers HOA Management and Association Management services for Socastee, SC

Socastee, South Carolina Facts & Information

Socastee, S.C. is an unincorporated area directly southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Socastee is located within Horry County. Even though Socastee is an unincorporated area, the United States Census Bureau categorizes the Socastee area as a census-designated place or a CDP. However, the area not being incorporated and being a census-designated place, there are no legally established or formal borders other than what the United States Census Bureau has set forth.  

The census-designated place for Socastee, as set forth by the United States Census Bureau in 2010, has a total area of 13.35 square miles. The established census-designated place may or may not be consistent with the local population’s perception of the area or community defined by the United States Census Bureau. Different factors go into establishing a census-designated place by the United States Census Bureau. In most cases, a census-designated place is established because of a higher population concentration. A higher population concentration is what is found within the Socastee census-designated place.  

The Early History of Socastee and the Surrounding Area

The Native Americans who populated the future Socastee area were the Waccamaw people. They fished and hunted the lands and rivers in the area. There are Native American burial mounds located on Waties Island, a barrier island along Long Bay. 

Even though settlers of European descent arrived in the future Myrtle Beach area in the late 1700s, the area remained essentially sparsely populated. The environment was apparently not conducive to farming and other enterprises on a scale compared to other South Carolina areas. The early settlers make an effort to grow indigo and tobacco with apparently less than favorable results. The area’s sandy soil proved to be less than conducive to the quality yields of these two crops. 

In 1881, the Burroughs and Collins Company of Conway, the forerunner of present-day Burroughs & Chapin, acquired a large tract of land in the future Myrtle Beach. Burroughs & Chapin’s intent was to harvest the trees and needed an efficient method to transport the timber to the railhead in Conway. 

Burroughs and Collins received a state charter to build the Conway & Seashore Railroad to transport timber from the coast inland to Conway on February 28, 1899. The railroad was operational on May 1, 1900. Upon the completion of the Conway & Seashore Railroad and the harvesting of timber greatly expanded the economic development of the entire region. 

Socastee is a Native American name reportedly derived from “Sawkastee” that is found in the original 1711 Percival Pawley land grand.  In 1781, there was a small engagement between American Patriot forces and British forces in Socastee. The original Socastee settlement was located midway between the Waccamaw River and the Atlantic Ocean, approximately three miles from each body of water. The Socastee settlement was an important hub for the manufacturing and distribution of naval stores such as turpentine and tar by the 1870s.

By the end of the 19th century, the Socastee area was home to turpentine distilleries, sawmills, and a mercantile business owned by Burroughs & Collins Company. There was also a cotton gin, grist mill, a cooper shop, and a general store. There were around a dozen families living in Socastee. There was one well-equipped and well-supplied school with a principal and two teachers. 

There was one large Methodist church in Socastee at the end of the 19th century. This was the Socastee Methodist Church organized by 1818. The first services of this church were held under a brush arbor. The first sanctuary was a log structure constructed on land donated by Philip Elkes.   

The next sanctuary was a frame structure that featured a large portico with square columns. This second sanctuary was constructed in 1875 by W.T. Goldfinch of Conway. In 1833, Sunday school rooms were built onto the sanctuary. During the 1850s, the church was extensively remodeled and expanded and this work was completed in 1957. The current Socastee Methodist Church sanctuary was constructed in 1987.

Turpentining was the leading economic activity in Socastee from the early founding up through the early 1900s. Turpentine is a liquid acquired by the distillation of resin harvested from living trees, primarily pine trees. Turpentine is principally used as a specialized solvent. 

Other early agricultural activities in the Socastee area included corn and cotton. Additionally, Socastee was known for producing several thousand gallons of the finest quality blue cane syrup annually. Blue cane syrup rivaled maple syrup during this time period. Tobacco cultivation was also attempted around the end of the 19th century. 

The Maine-to-Florida Inland Waterway was completed on April 3, 1936. The last section of the waterway was through Socastee. On Saturday, April 11, 1936, the local celebration of the completion was held in Socastee. The celebration was hindered by massive flooding in the region. Many major roads were washed out and impassable. Now known as the Intra-Coastal Waterway, the waterway was a major economic development driver for the region and is still in use today.

The Socastee Historic District includes the S.S. Sarvis House built in 1881, the T.B. Cooper Store constructed in 1905, and the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Socastee Data and other Interesting Facts

– Socastee’s population, per the 2020 United States Census, was calculated to be 22,213. This is a 10.17 percent population growth increase since the 2010 United States Census. Socastee’s population, per the 2010 United States Census, was calculated to be 19,952. 

– Per Google Earth Location/Coordinates of Socastee – Latitude: 33°41′00.62″ N, Longitude: 78°59′54.29″ W

– Socastee’s Elevation above sea level is 14 feet per Google Earth for the coordinates or location noted above.

– Per the United States Census Bureau, as of 2012, Socastee had 1,514 total businesses or firms within the Socastee census-designated place.  

– The land area of the Socastee census-designated place, per the United States Census Bureau in 2010, was 13.35 square miles.  

– The Socastee census-designated place’s population per square mile was 1,495.0, per the United States Census Bureau for 2010. 

– Per the United States Census Bureau, 2015-2019, there were 8,798 households within the Socastee census-designated place.

– The area codes for Socastee census-designated places are 843 and 854.

– The ZIP code for Socastee census-designated place is 29588.

Areas within the Grand Strand:

Horry County, South Carolina

Briarcliffe Acres – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 470

Myrtle Beach – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 35,682

Springmaid Beach – section or neighborhood of Myrtle Beach)

Surfside Beach – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 3,837

North Myrtle Beach – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 18,790

Crescent Beach – section or neighborhood of  North Myrtle Beach

Windy Hill Beach – section or neighborhood North Myrtle Beach

Cherry Grove Beach – section or neighborhood of North Myrtle Beach

Ocean Drive Beach – section or neighborhood of North Myrtle Beach

Atlantic Beach – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 334

Garden City – an unincorporated area within Horry County with a 2020 population of 10,235

Little River – an unincorporated area within Horry County with a 2020 population of 11,711

Georgetown County, South Carolina

Litchfield Beach – an unincorporated area within Georgetown County

Pawleys Island – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 103

Georgetown – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 11,916

Murrells Inlet – an unincorporated area within Georgetown County with a 2020 population of 9,740

DeBordieu – unincorporated area within Georgetown County

Apex nc


William Douglas Property Management offers HOA Management and Association Management services for Socastee, SC

Socastee, South Carolina Facts & Information

Socastee, S.C. is an unincorporated area directly southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Socastee is located within Horry County. Even though Socastee is an unincorporated area, the United States Census Bureau categorizes the Socastee area as a census-designated place or a CDP. However, the area not being incorporated and being a census-designated place, there are no legally established or formal borders other than what the United States Census Bureau has set forth.

The census-designated place for Socastee, as set forth by the United States Census Bureau in 2010, has a total area of 13.35 square miles. The established census-designated place may or may not be consistent with the local population’s perception of the area or community defined by the United States Census Bureau. Different factors go into establishing a census-designated place by the United States Census Bureau. In most cases, a census-designated place is established because of a higher population concentration. A higher population concentration is what is found within the Socastee census-designated place.

The Early History of Socastee and the Surrounding Area

The Native Americans who populated the future Socastee area were the Waccamaw people. They fished and hunted the lands and rivers in the area. There are Native American burial mounds located on Waties Island, a barrier island along Long Bay.

Even though settlers of European descent arrived in the future Myrtle Beach area in the late 1700s, the area remained essentially sparsely populated. The environment was apparently not conducive to farming and other enterprises on a scale compared to other South Carolina areas. The early settlers make an effort to grow indigo and tobacco with apparently less than favorable results. The area’s sandy soil proved to be less than conducive to the quality yields of these two crops.

In 1881, the Burroughs and Collins Company of Conway, the forerunner of present-day Burroughs & Chapin, acquired a large tract of land in the future Myrtle Beach. Burroughs & Chapin’s intent was to harvest the trees and needed an efficient method to transport the timber to the railhead in Conway.

Burroughs and Collins received a state charter to build the Conway & Seashore Railroad to transport timber from the coast inland to Conway on February 28, 1899. The railroad was operational on May 1, 1900. Upon the completion of the Conway & Seashore Railroad and the harvesting of timber greatly expanded the economic development of the entire region.

Socastee is a Native American name reportedly derived from “Sawkastee” that is found in the original 1711 Percival Pawley land grand.  In 1781, there was a small engagement between American Patriot forces and British forces in Socastee. The original Socastee settlement was located midway between the Waccamaw River and the Atlantic Ocean, approximately three miles from each body of water. The Socastee settlement was an important hub for the manufacturing and distribution of naval stores such as turpentine and tar by the 1870s.

By the end of the 19th century, the Socastee area was home to turpentine distilleries, sawmills, and a mercantile business owned by Burroughs & Collins Company. There was also a cotton gin, grist mill, a cooper shop, and a general store. There were around a dozen families living in Socastee. There was one well-equipped and well-supplied school with a principal and two teachers.

There was one large Methodist church in Socastee at the end of the 19th century. This was the Socastee Methodist Church organized by 1818. The first services of this church were held under a brush arbor. The first sanctuary was a log structure constructed on land donated by Philip Elkes.   

The next sanctuary was a frame structure that featured a large portico with square columns. This second sanctuary was constructed in 1875 by W.T. Goldfinch of Conway. In 1833, Sunday school rooms were built onto the sanctuary. During the 1850s, the church was extensively remodeled and expanded and this work was completed in 1957. The current Socastee Methodist Church sanctuary was constructed in 1987.

Turpentining was the leading economic activity in Socastee from the early founding up through the early 1900s. Turpentine is a liquid acquired by the distillation of resin harvested from living trees, primarily pine trees. Turpentine is principally used as a specialized solvent.

Other early agricultural activities in the Socastee area included corn and cotton. Additionally, Socastee was known for producing several thousand gallons of the finest quality blue cane syrup annually. Blue cane syrup rivaled maple syrup during this time period. Tobacco cultivation was also attempted around the end of the 19th century.

The Maine-to-Florida Inland Waterway was completed on April 3, 1936. The last section of the waterway was through Socastee. On Saturday, April 11, 1936, the local celebration of the completion was held in Socastee. The celebration was hindered by massive flooding in the region. Many major roads were washed out and impassable. Now known as the Intra-Coastal Waterway, the waterway was a major economic development driver for the region and is still in use today.

The Socastee Historic District includes the S.S. Sarvis House built in 1881, the T.B. Cooper Store constructed in 1905, and the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Socastee Data and other Interesting Facts

– Socastee’s population, per the 2020 United States Census, was calculated to be 22,213. This is a 10.17 percent population growth increase since the 2010 United States Census. Socastee’s population, per the 2010 United States Census, was calculated to be 19,952.

– Per Google Earth Location/Coordinates of Socastee – Latitude: 33°41′00.62″ N, Longitude: 78°59′54.29″ W

– Socastee’s Elevation above sea level is 14 feet per Google Earth for the coordinates or location noted above.

– Per the United States Census Bureau, as of 2012, Socastee had 1,514 total businesses or firms within the Socastee census-designated place.

– The land area of the Socastee census-designated place, per the United States Census Bureau in 2010, was 13.35 square miles.

– The Socastee census-designated place’s population per square mile was 1,495.0, per the United States Census Bureau for 2010.

– Per the United States Census Bureau, 2015-2019, there were 8,798 households within the Socastee census-designated place.

– The area codes for Socastee census-designated places are 843 and 854.

– The ZIP code for Socastee census-designated place is 29588.

Areas within the Grand Strand:

Horry County, South Carolina

Briarcliffe Acres – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 470

Myrtle Beach – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 35,682

Springmaid Beach – section or neighborhood of Myrtle Beach)

Surfside Beach – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 3,837

North Myrtle Beach – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 18,790

Crescent Beach – section or neighborhood of  North Myrtle Beach

Windy Hill Beach – section or neighborhood North Myrtle Beach

Cherry Grove Beach – section or neighborhood of North Myrtle Beach

Ocean Drive Beach – section or neighborhood of North Myrtle Beach

Atlantic Beach – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 334

Garden City – an unincorporated area within Horry County with a 2020 population of 10,235

Little River – an unincorporated area within Horry County with a 2020 population of 11,711

Georgetown County, South Carolina

Litchfield Beach – an unincorporated area within Georgetown County

Pawleys Island – a municipal town with a 2010 population of 103

Georgetown – a municipal city with a 2020 population of 11,916

Murrells Inlet – an unincorporated area within Georgetown County with a 2020 population of 9,740

DeBordieu – unincorporated area within Georgetown County

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