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tryon nc


William Douglas Property Management offers HOA Management and Association Management services in Tryon, NC

Tryon, NC Facts and Information

The Town of Tryon is a municipality located in Polk County, North Carolina. Tryon has a town charter. Polk County is in the western mountainous region of North Carolina. The first recorded inhabitants of the future Tryon area were the Cherokee Indians. The area was considered the Cherokee Indian hunting grounds.  

  • The population for 2019 per the United States Census for Tryon was estimated to be 1,615. 
  • The population per the 2010 United States Census of Tryon was calculated to be 1,646.
  • The first Census for Tryon was the 1900 United States Census. The population was calculated to be 324.
  • Tryon’s town motto: “The Friendliest Town in The South.”
  • Tryon was incorporated as “Tryon City” in March of 1885 by the North Carolina General Assembly.
  • Tryon was known as “Tryon City” until 1891, when on February 16, 1891, the North Carolina General Assembly amended the charter, making Tryon a town. Thereafter, “Tryon City” was known as “Tryon.”
  • Tryon is the 278th largest municipality in North Carolina.
  • Tryon is named for the British Royal North Carolina Governor William Tryon (1729-1788). He served as the eighth governor from 1764 to 1771.
  • The median household income in Tryon is $31,449.
  • The land area of Tryon is 2.00 square miles per the 2010 United States Census  
  • The population per square mile of Tryon is 534.5 per the 2010 United States Census  
  • The ZIP Code for Tryon is 28782.
  • The Area Code for Tryon is 828.
  • Per the United States Census Bureau, there are 869 households in Tryon.
  • Coordinates or location of Tryon per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°12′29.41″ N, Longitude: 82°14′18.41″ W
  • The elevation of Tryon is 1,067 feet above sea level.

A Short Overview of Tryon and the Surrounding Area

Tryon is situated at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The area is considered to have a year-round moderate climate. Tryon and the surrounding area have become a retirement and vacation destination.  

Conveniently located to an extensive highway system, Tyron is close, without being too close to everything. Interstate Highway 26 is around four miles from away, via Exit 67, the Columbus – Tryon Exit. Then access U.S. Highway 176/N.C. Highway 108 to Tryon. 

Distance from Tryon:

Spartanburg, South Carolina – 30 miles

Asheville, North Carolina – 45 miles

Greenville, South Carolina – 49 miles

Charlotte, North Carolina – 84 miles

Columbia, South Carolina – 118 miles

Knoxville, Tennessee – 149 miles

Atlanta, Georgia – 192 miles

Charleston, South Carolina – 228 miles

Raleigh, North Carolina – 250 miles

Jacksonville, Florida – 403 miles

Tryon – Origin of Town Name Origin

The Town of Tryon is named for Lieutenant General William Tryon (1729-1788), the British Royal North Carolina Governor from 1764 to 1771. William Tryon was a British Army general and British Royal colonial official. He was the eighth royal governor of North Carolina. In addition to being the eighth royal governor of North Carolina, he was appointed by the British Crown as the 39th governor of New York from 1771 to 1777. 

Tryon was born June 8, 1729, in Surrey, England, to a prominent family. In 1751, he entered the British Army at 22 years old as a lieutenant in the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards. Tryon advanced rapidly was made a captain that same year. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1758. 

Lt. Colonel Tryon commanded a regiment in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) in which he was wounded in the thigh and head. Tryon obtained the position of acting lieutenant governor of the Province of North Carolina in 1764. He obtained this position through his family’s political connections. 

Upon Tryon’s arrival in October 1764, the previous governor, Arthur Dobbs, had not left and was still holding office. He informed Tryon that he would not be leaving until May. However, Dobbs died in office in March of 1765. King George appointed him to the office of governor.

Tyron accomplished a great deal as royal governor of North Carolina. He had the Tryon Palace (completed in 1770) constructed in New Bern, which he designated the provincial capital of North Carolina. Tyron established the first postal system in 1769. Tyron is probably best remembered for putting down the Regulator Uprising (1768-1771) in western North Carolina.  

Tryon – Development 

The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad rail line reached Tryon in 1878. The train station was known as “Tryon Station,” and it was completed in 1878 as well. The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad in 1878 operated from Spartanburg, South Carolina, to Hendersonville, North Carolina. Newspaper accounts of the time remark on the scenic views obtained from the rail travel of this rail line. The views of heavily forested mountains and valleys were reported to be spectacular and not commonly found. From the July 31, 1878, edition of The Charlotte Observer, “Standing on the rear platform as the train sweeps over and around this graceful curve, you take in, at a glance, a grand panorama of wondrous and striking beauty, in whose formation the resources of nature and art have happily combined.” 

The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad had persistent financial problems. This was apparently due to initially underfunding the project’s excessive expenses related to the construction of the railroad. Construction of the railroad into the mountainous regions, traversing gorges, tunneling, all of these many aspects made this an expensive endeavor. Another factor that contributed to the operational and financial difficulty of the railroad was the continued safety issues. Wrecks with related fatalities plagued the railroad. The financial conditions of the Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad worsened to such an extent that in 1881 the railroad filed for bankruptcy protection. It was reorganized as the Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad in 1881. The Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad did not fair much better and sold at foreclosure on February 15, 1895. The foreclosed property was leased to the Southern Railway on November 11, 1895, and eventually merged into the Southern Railway – Carolina Division in 1902. The rail line was still plagued with safety issues, and by 1903, 27 deaths had been attributed since inception.

The Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad eventually reached Asheville in 1886. The railroad played a huge part in the development of Tryon. It became popular with tourists escaping the heat and malaria of the South Carolina Low Country during their summer months. 

Tryon was known as “Tryon City” up until 1891, when on February 16, 1891, the North Carolina General Assembly amended the charter, making Tryon a town. Thereafter, “Tryon City” was known as “Tryon.”

Tyron – The 1900s

Tyron has been a beacon for artists and celebrities, and this all began around the turn of the 20th century. This list includes writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, actor and playwright William Gillette, the wife of President Calvin Coolidge, Grace Coolidge, and Kenneth Lackey, a vaudeville performer. The most famous person from Tryon was performer and singer Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name, Nina Simone (1933-2003).    

Economy

Equestrian endeavors and vineyards have played the largest role historically and currently in the economy of Tyron. In 1925, the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club was established by Carter P. Brown. Brown was a visionary entrepreneur and promoter of the area. The Tryon Riding and Hunt Club have sponsored the Block House Steeplechase every year since 1946. There are other equestrian organizations and activities throughout the Tryon area. To name a few: The Blue Ridge Hunter Jumper Association (BRHJA), the Carolina Carriage Club, the Foothills Riding Club, the Tryon Hounds, Foothills Equestrian Trails Association (FETA), and the Foothills Equestrian Nature Center (FENCE).

Vineyards became prevalent around the turn of the 20th century. Tryon was known for cultivating high-quality wine and table grapes. Tryon and the surrounding area supported several family-owned vineyards. When Prohibition came in with the passing of the Eighteenth Amendment prohibiting the sale of alcohol in 1919, these vineyards were forced out of business. Vineyards have been reestablished in the Tryon area, and the wine-making tradition has returned to a degree. 

Tourism historically continues to play a large part in the economy of Tryon and the surrounding area. The changing seasons and equestrian events play the largest part in this tourism. Another factor is the large percentage of part-time residents with second homes in Tryon. Seasonal residents swell the population during the summer months along with the tourists.  

tryon nc


William Douglas Property Management offers HOA Management and Association Management services in Tryon, NC

Tryon, NC Facts and Information

The Town of Tryon is a municipality located in Polk County, North Carolina. Tryon has a town charter. Polk County is in the western mountainous region of North Carolina. The first recorded inhabitants of the future Tryon area were the Cherokee Indians. The area was considered the Cherokee Indian hunting grounds.

  • The population for 2019 per the United States Census for Tryon was estimated to be 1,615.
  • The population per the 2010 United States Census of Tryon was calculated to be 1,646.
  • The first Census for Tryon was the 1900 United States Census. The population was calculated to be 324.
  • Tryon’s town motto: “The Friendliest Town in The South.”
  • Tryon was incorporated as “Tryon City” in March of 1885 by the North Carolina General Assembly.
  • Tryon was known as “Tryon City” until 1891, when on February 16, 1891, the North Carolina General Assembly amended the charter, making Tryon a town. Thereafter, “Tryon City” was known as “Tryon.”
  • Tryon is the 278th largest municipality in North Carolina.
  • Tryon is named for the British Royal North Carolina Governor William Tryon (1729-1788). He served as the eighth governor from 1764 to 1771.
  • The median household income in Tryon is $31,449.
  • The land area of Tryon is 2.00 square miles per the 2010 United States Census
  • The population per square mile of Tryon is 534.5 per the 2010 United States Census
  • The ZIP Code for Tryon is 28782.
  • The Area Code for Tryon is 828.
  • Per the United States Census Bureau, there are 869 households in Tryon.
  • Coordinates or location of Tryon per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°12′29.41″ N, Longitude: 82°14′18.41″ W
  • The elevation of Tryon is 1,067 feet above sea level.

A Short Overview of Tryon and the Surrounding Area

Tryon is situated at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The area is considered to have a year-round moderate climate. Tryon and the surrounding area have become a retirement and vacation destination.

Conveniently located to an extensive highway system, Tyron is close, without being too close to everything. Interstate Highway 26 is around four miles from away, via Exit 67, the Columbus – Tryon Exit. Then access U.S. Highway 176/N.C. Highway 108 to Tryon.

Distance from Tryon:

Spartanburg, South Carolina – 30 miles

Asheville, North Carolina – 45 miles

Greenville, South Carolina – 49 miles

Charlotte, North Carolina – 84 miles

Columbia, South Carolina – 118 miles

Knoxville, Tennessee – 149 miles

Atlanta, Georgia – 192 miles

Charleston, South Carolina – 228 miles

Raleigh, North Carolina – 250 miles

Jacksonville, Florida – 403 miles

Tryon – Origin of Town Name Origin

The Town of Tryon is named for Lieutenant General William Tryon (1729-1788), the British Royal North Carolina Governor from 1764 to 1771. William Tryon was a British Army general and British Royal colonial official. He was the eighth royal governor of North Carolina. In addition to being the eighth royal governor of North Carolina, he was appointed by the British Crown as the 39th governor of New York from 1771 to 1777.

Tryon was born June 8, 1729, in Surrey, England, to a prominent family. In 1751, he entered the British Army at 22 years old as a lieutenant in the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards. Tryon advanced rapidly was made a captain that same year. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1758.

Lt. Colonel Tryon commanded a regiment in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) in which he was wounded in the thigh and head. Tryon obtained the position of acting lieutenant governor of the Province of North Carolina in 1764. He obtained this position through his family’s political connections.

Upon Tryon’s arrival in October 1764, the previous governor, Arthur Dobbs, had not left and was still holding office. He informed Tryon that he would not be leaving until May. However, Dobbs died in office in March of 1765. King George appointed him to the office of governor.

Tyron accomplished a great deal as royal governor of North Carolina. He had the Tryon Palace (completed in 1770) constructed in New Bern, which he designated the provincial capital of North Carolina. Tyron established the first postal system in 1769. Tyron is probably best remembered for putting down the Regulator Uprising (1768-1771) in western North Carolina.

Tryon – Development

The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad rail line reached Tryon in 1878. The train station was known as “Tryon Station,” and it was completed in 1878 as well. The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad in 1878 operated from Spartanburg, South Carolina, to Hendersonville, North Carolina. Newspaper accounts of the time remark on the scenic views obtained from the rail travel of this rail line. The views of heavily forested mountains and valleys were reported to be spectacular and not commonly found. From the July 31, 1878, edition of The Charlotte Observer, “Standing on the rear platform as the train sweeps over and around this graceful curve, you take in, at a glance, a grand panorama of wondrous and striking beauty, in whose formation the resources of nature and art have happily combined.”

The Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad had persistent financial problems. This was apparently due to initially underfunding the project’s excessive expenses related to the construction of the railroad. Construction of the railroad into the mountainous regions, traversing gorges, tunneling, all of these many aspects made this an expensive endeavor. Another factor that contributed to the operational and financial difficulty of the railroad was the continued safety issues. Wrecks with related fatalities plagued the railroad. The financial conditions of the Spartanburg & Asheville Railroad worsened to such an extent that in 1881 the railroad filed for bankruptcy protection. It was reorganized as the Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad in 1881. The Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad did not fair much better and sold at foreclosure on February 15, 1895. The foreclosed property was leased to the Southern Railway on November 11, 1895, and eventually merged into the Southern Railway – Carolina Division in 1902. The rail line was still plagued with safety issues, and by 1903, 27 deaths had been attributed since inception.

The Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad eventually reached Asheville in 1886. The railroad played a huge part in the development of Tryon. It became popular with tourists escaping the heat and malaria of the South Carolina Low Country during their summer months.

Tryon was known as “Tryon City” up until 1891, when on February 16, 1891, the North Carolina General Assembly amended the charter, making Tryon a town. Thereafter, “Tryon City” was known as “Tryon.”

Tyron – The 1900s

Tyron has been a beacon for artists and celebrities, and this all began around the turn of the 20th century. This list includes writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, actor and playwright William Gillette, the wife of President Calvin Coolidge, Grace Coolidge, and Kenneth Lackey, a vaudeville performer. The most famous person from Tryon was performer and singer Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name, Nina Simone (1933-2003).    

Economy

Equestrian endeavors and vineyards have played the largest role historically and currently in the economy of Tyron. In 1925, the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club was established by Carter P. Brown. Brown was a visionary entrepreneur and promoter of the area. The Tryon Riding and Hunt Club have sponsored the Block House Steeplechase every year since 1946. There are other equestrian organizations and activities throughout the Tryon area. To name a few: The Blue Ridge Hunter Jumper Association (BRHJA), the Carolina Carriage Club, the Foothills Riding Club, the Tryon Hounds, Foothills Equestrian Trails Association (FETA), and the Foothills Equestrian Nature Center (FENCE).

Vineyards became prevalent around the turn of the 20th century. Tryon was known for cultivating high-quality wine and table grapes. Tryon and the surrounding area supported several family-owned vineyards. When Prohibition came in with the passing of the Eighteenth Amendment prohibiting the sale of alcohol in 1919, these vineyards were forced out of business. Vineyards have been reestablished in the Tryon area, and the wine-making tradition has returned to a degree.

Tourism historically continues to play a large part in the economy of Tryon and the surrounding area. The changing seasons and equestrian events play the largest part in this tourism. Another factor is the large percentage of part-time residents with second homes in Tryon. Seasonal residents swell the population during the summer months along with the tourists.

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