Need Association Management?

Contact Us

Waynesville

The town offers stunning scenery and year-round outdoor recreational opportunities, appealing to residents and tourists of all types. For these reasons, Waynesville has become a popular retirement destination over the years. With a longstanding presence in Western North Carolina, William Douglas Property Management has a firm understanding of the needs of Waynesville residents. Please contact us today to learn more!

Waynesville is a municipality located in Haywood County, North Carolina. Waynesville was established in  1810 and incorporated as a township in 1871. 

  • Per the 2020 United States Census, the population of Waynesville was calculated to be 10,140. 
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, the population of Waynesville was calculated to be 9,869.
  • Per the 1880 United States Census, the first Census for the Town of Waynesville, the population was calculated to be 225.
  • Waynesville is the county seat of Haywood County. 
  • Waynesville was founded in 1810 by Revolutionary War veteran Colonel Robert Love (1760 – 1845). The town was named in honor of Colonel Love’s Revolutionary War leader Major General “Mad Anthony” Wayne (1745 – 1796). 
  • Waynesville was originally named Mount Prospect.
  • The town of Hazelwood merged into Waynesville on July 1, 1995.
  • The land area of Waynesville is 8.92 square miles per the 2010 United States Census  
  • The population per square mile of Waynesville is 1,105.9 per the 2010 United States Census  
  • Town motto: “Haywood County’s Gem” and “Gateway to the Smokies.”
  • The coordinates of Waynesville per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°29′28.37″N, Longitude: 82°58′52.36″ W
  • Elevation of Waynesville 2,713 feet
  • Annual Climate:

Average Annual Temperature: 54.1 degrees

January Monthly Average: 37.5 degrees

June Monthly Average: 70.7 degrees

Rainfall Annual Average: 47.5 inches

Snowfall Annual Average: 12.2 inches

Brief Overview of Waynesville and Surrounding Area

Colonel Robert Love (1760 – 1845) donated the land for the courthouse, jail, and town square that would become Waynesville. Originally, Waynesville was named and established as Mount Prospect. Colonel Love, a Revolutionary War veteran, changed the town name in honor his wartime commander Major General “Mad Anthony” Wayne. Major General Anthony Wayne (1745 – 1796) was an American Revolutionary War leader and post-war statesman. His Revolutionary War military achievements and his fierce temperament earned him advancement to general and the moniker “Mad Anthony.” At the conclusion of the American Revolution, Wayne settled on land granted him in Georgia for his service during the war. Wayne represented Georgia in the United States House of Representatives. He then returned to active military service in command of the Legion of the United States. Wayne’s Legion of the United States vanquished an alliance of Indian tribes known as the Western Confederacy at the 1794 Battle of Fallen Timbers. 

While Major General Mad Anthony Wayne was one of the more interesting military leaders of the American Revolution, Colonel Robert Love, was by all reports, a very interesting person in his own right. Love became wealthy and a prominent political figure in North Carolina. Love was reportedly most proficient with firearms and a prominent duelist. Legion has it that around 1790, that he and future United States President Andrew Jackson wagered on a horse race. Jackson learned that Love had gotten Jackson’s rider intoxicated. A shouting match between Love and Jackson followed. Reportedly, Love proposed a duel to Jackson to resolve the dispute. Jackson reportedly elected to decline this offer. If this story is accurate, it would be one of the few reported times in Andrew Jackson’s life that he would decline to settle a dispute with violence.   

The Battle of Waynesville, also known as North Carolina’s “Last Shot” in the American Civil War. Thirty days after the surrender of the Confederacy at Appomattox Court House, Confederate Brigadier General James Green Martin surrendered the Army of Western North Carolina on May 7, 1865, at Waynesville. Martin’s surrender was after a small engagement between the Confederate forces of Thomas’ Legion of Highlanders and Union forces at White Sulphur Springs. Thomas’ Legion had engaged the Union forces, and the Union forces had fallen back to Waynesville. Martin arrived in Waynesville the following day and surrendered the confederate forces, troops under his command. The exact date of the surrender is noted for history as of May 7, 1865. However, Union Brigadier General Davis Tillson noted the surrender date in his report as of May 3. Robert T. Conley, of Thomas’s Legion, who participated in the White Sulphur Springs engagement and the surrender in Waynesville the following day, recorded the skirmish occurring on May 6 and surrender occurring the following day. There is a mistaken belief that Waynesville is the site of the last battle of the American Civil War. This mistaken belief is perpetuated by a stone and cement pyramid-shaped Confederate “Last Shot” Memorial in Waynesville dedicated in 1923.  

Waynesville’s population and economic development did not begin in earnest until the arrival of the Western North Carolina Railroad in 1884. Western North Carolina Railroad laid the train tracks northwest downhill from Main Street along Richland Creek in Waynesville. This area was primarily undeveloped marshland with a few scattered structures disbursed along the landscape. A train depot was constructed along the track and additional structures developed over time. The area became known as “Frog Level” because of the location beside Richland Creek and being prone to flooding.

The population growth and economic growth are best expressed and surmised by the United States Census data below. The population more than doubled between the 1880 and 1890 United States Census and then almost tripled by the 1900 United States Census.   

Waynesville Historic Population Per the United States Census

1880 225

1890 455

1900 1,307

1910 2,008

1920 1,942

1930 2,414

1940 2,940

1950 5,295

1960 6,159

1970 6,488

1980 6,765

1990 6,758

2000 9,232

2010 9,869

2020 10,140

The Western North Carolina Railroad opened up Waynesville and the entire region to economic development to a level never seen to this point. This economic development in Waynesville and the surrounding area initially revolved around agriculture, lumber, and tourism. Main Street/downtown and Frog Level developed into the commercial centers of Waynesville. This area was the central business district of Waynesville through the 1950s. The central business district included hardware stores, banks, and retail stores. Today this area of Waynesville is home to retail shops, art galleries, cafes, restaurants, banks, doctor’s offices, and governmental administration offices.

Area Schools in Waynesville

Tuscola High School

Waynesville Middle School

Junaluska Elementary

Hazelwood Elementary

Hiring a Homeowner Association Management Company in Waynesville, North Carolina

The majority of residential subdivisions being developed today are being established under a homeowner association’s covenants, conditions, and restrictions. A homeowner association or HOA is formed to protect the property values of the members. This is achieved by managing the governing documents of the HOA. A homeowner association management company handles HOA’s day-to-day operations at the direction of the HOA’s board of directors. According to surveys, the overwhelming majority of North Carolinians who reside within homeowner’s associations and condominiums are overwhelmingly happy with their communities.

The HOA is responsible for maintaining the common elements of the HOA and covenant enforcement of the membership. However, these tasks can be overly burdensome for the HOA board of directors. As a result, many homeowners association’s boards of directors employ an HOA Management Company. The decision to hire a homeowner association management company should be given the weight it deserves because it impacts the community long-term. Let’s take a look at the advantages of hiring an HOA property management company.

1. Association Management Experience 

A homeowner association management company should have years of experience in dealing with various issues that arise within homeowner associations. Experience reading and understanding the governing documents of homeowner associations. A good homeowner association management company knows the best way to advise and apply covenant enforcement, describe these matters s clearly, and communicate changes to the HOA community members in the most efficient manner possible.

2. Fiscal and Administrative Responsibilities

The homeowner association management company manages the financial matters of the HOA at the direction of the HOA board of directors. The association management company is responsible for financial tasks such as paying invoices and billing members. The HOA management company assists the HOA board of directors in finding and hiring service providers for repairs and routine maintenance. The HOA management company keeps the HOA’s financial records for audits. Essentially, an HOA management company makes accounting and administrative processes easier by guaranteeing that all operations are legal.

3. Community Commitment

An HOA management company is only as good as the homeowner association it serves; thus, they take great care and responsibility in establishing the best community environment possible. A good association management company should always strive to make sure the HOA board of directors is making the best decisions possible. 

5. Assist in Finding and Hiring Vendors

HOA board members do not always have the resources and network connections to locate the most cost-effective and high-quality vendors. With the assistance of an HOA management company, that firm will typically have a huge array of resources to find quality vendors to recommend to a board of directors.

6. Keep the Board of Directors Abreast of Issues

An aspect of the association management company’s responsibilities includes providing the board of directors information, such as pending legislation, that could impact the HOA. Furthermore, the HOA management company educates the membership on issues that can impact the HOA 

7. Adding Value to the Property

The entire HOA will benefit from the presence of an HOA community manager. The ultimate goal of the HOA board of directors and the association management company are to improve overall property values within the homeowner association. Professional management is more of an investment in the community, and you can be certain that all members will benefit in the short term and long term.

In Waynesville, the following sites are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

The Boone-Withers House, Citizens Bank and Trust Company Building, Former, Francis Grist Mill, Frog Level Historic District, Haywood County Courthouse, Alden and Thomasene Howell House, Masonic Hall, Charles, and Annie Quinlan House, Clyde H. Ray Sr. House, Frank Smathers House, Spread Out Historic District, Waynesville Municipal Building, Dr. J. Howell Way House, and Waynesville Main Street Historic District.

Waynesville

The town offers stunning scenery and year-round outdoor recreational opportunities, appealing to residents and tourists of all types. For these reasons, Waynesville has become a popular retirement destination over the years. With a longstanding presence in Western North Carolina, William Douglas Property Management has a firm understanding of the needs of Waynesville residents. Please contact us today to learn more!

Waynesville is a municipality located in Haywood County, North Carolina. Waynesville was established in  1810 and incorporated as a township in 1871.

  • Per the 2020 United States Census, the population of Waynesville was calculated to be 10,140.
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, the population of Waynesville was calculated to be 9,869.
  • Per the 1880 United States Census, the first Census for the Town of Waynesville, the population was calculated to be 225.
  • Waynesville is the county seat of Haywood County.
  • Waynesville was founded in 1810 by Revolutionary War veteran Colonel Robert Love (1760 – 1845). The town was named in honor of Colonel Love’s Revolutionary War leader Major General “Mad Anthony” Wayne (1745 – 1796).
  • Waynesville was originally named Mount Prospect.
  • The town of Hazelwood merged into Waynesville on July 1, 1995.
  • The land area of Waynesville is 8.92 square miles per the 2010 United States Census
  • The population per square mile of Waynesville is 1,105.9 per the 2010 United States Census
  • Town motto: “Haywood County’s Gem” and “Gateway to the Smokies.”
  • The coordinates of Waynesville per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°29′28.37″N, Longitude: 82°58′52.36″ W
  • Elevation of Waynesville 2,713 feet
  • Annual Climate:

Average Annual Temperature: 54.1 degrees

January Monthly Average: 37.5 degrees

June Monthly Average: 70.7 degrees

Rainfall Annual Average: 47.5 inches

Snowfall Annual Average: 12.2 inches

Brief Overview of Waynesville and Surrounding Area

Colonel Robert Love (1760 – 1845) donated the land for the courthouse, jail, and town square that would become Waynesville. Originally, Waynesville was named and established as Mount Prospect. Colonel Love, a Revolutionary War veteran, changed the town name in honor his wartime commander Major General “Mad Anthony” Wayne. Major General Anthony Wayne (1745 – 1796) was an American Revolutionary War leader and post-war statesman. His Revolutionary War military achievements and his fierce temperament earned him advancement to general and the moniker “Mad Anthony.” At the conclusion of the American Revolution, Wayne settled on land granted him in Georgia for his service during the war. Wayne represented Georgia in the United States House of Representatives. He then returned to active military service in command of the Legion of the United States. Wayne’s Legion of the United States vanquished an alliance of Indian tribes known as the Western Confederacy at the 1794 Battle of Fallen Timbers.

While Major General Mad Anthony Wayne was one of the more interesting military leaders of the American Revolution, Colonel Robert Love, was by all reports, a very interesting person in his own right. Love became wealthy and a prominent political figure in North Carolina. Love was reportedly most proficient with firearms and a prominent duelist. Legion has it that around 1790, that he and future United States President Andrew Jackson wagered on a horse race. Jackson learned that Love had gotten Jackson’s rider intoxicated. A shouting match between Love and Jackson followed. Reportedly, Love proposed a duel to Jackson to resolve the dispute. Jackson reportedly elected to decline this offer. If this story is accurate, it would be one of the few reported times in Andrew Jackson’s life that he would decline to settle a dispute with violence.   

The Battle of Waynesville, also known as North Carolina’s “Last Shot” in the American Civil War. Thirty days after the surrender of the Confederacy at Appomattox Court House, Confederate Brigadier General James Green Martin surrendered the Army of Western North Carolina on May 7, 1865, at Waynesville. Martin’s surrender was after a small engagement between the Confederate forces of Thomas’ Legion of Highlanders and Union forces at White Sulphur Springs. Thomas’ Legion had engaged the Union forces, and the Union forces had fallen back to Waynesville. Martin arrived in Waynesville the following day and surrendered the confederate forces, troops under his command. The exact date of the surrender is noted for history as of May 7, 1865. However, Union Brigadier General Davis Tillson noted the surrender date in his report as of May 3. Robert T. Conley, of Thomas’s Legion, who participated in the White Sulphur Springs engagement and the surrender in Waynesville the following day, recorded the skirmish occurring on May 6 and surrender occurring the following day. There is a mistaken belief that Waynesville is the site of the last battle of the American Civil War. This mistaken belief is perpetuated by a stone and cement pyramid-shaped Confederate “Last Shot” Memorial in Waynesville dedicated in 1923.

Waynesville’s population and economic development did not begin in earnest until the arrival of the Western North Carolina Railroad in 1884. Western North Carolina Railroad laid the train tracks northwest downhill from Main Street along Richland Creek in Waynesville. This area was primarily undeveloped marshland with a few scattered structures disbursed along the landscape. A train depot was constructed along the track and additional structures developed over time. The area became known as “Frog Level” because of the location beside Richland Creek and being prone to flooding.

The population growth and economic growth are best expressed and surmised by the United States Census data below. The population more than doubled between the 1880 and 1890 United States Census and then almost tripled by the 1900 United States Census.   

Waynesville Historic Population Per the United States Census

1880 225

1890 455

1900 1,307

1910 2,008

1920 1,942

1930 2,414

1940 2,940

1950 5,295

1960 6,159

1970 6,488

1980 6,765

1990 6,758

2000 9,232

2010 9,869

2020 10,140

The Western North Carolina Railroad opened up Waynesville and the entire region to economic development to a level never seen to this point. This economic development in Waynesville and the surrounding area initially revolved around agriculture, lumber, and tourism. Main Street/downtown and Frog Level developed into the commercial centers of Waynesville. This area was the central business district of Waynesville through the 1950s. The central business district included hardware stores, banks, and retail stores. Today this area of Waynesville is home to retail shops, art galleries, cafes, restaurants, banks, doctor’s offices, and governmental administration offices.

Area Schools in Waynesville

Tuscola High School

Waynesville Middle School

Junaluska Elementary

Hazelwood Elementary

Hiring a Homeowner Association Management Company in Waynesville, North Carolina

The majority of residential subdivisions being developed today are being established under a homeowner association’s covenants, conditions, and restrictions. A homeowner association or HOA is formed to protect the property values of the members. This is achieved by managing the governing documents of the HOA. A homeowner association management company handles HOA’s day-to-day operations at the direction of the HOA’s board of directors. According to surveys, the overwhelming majority of North Carolinians who reside within homeowner’s associations and condominiums are overwhelmingly happy with their communities.

The HOA is responsible for maintaining the common elements of the HOA and covenant enforcement of the membership. However, these tasks can be overly burdensome for the HOA board of directors. As a result, many homeowners association’s boards of directors employ an HOA Management Company. The decision to hire a homeowner association management company should be given the weight it deserves because it impacts the community long-term. Let’s take a look at the advantages of hiring an HOA property management company.

1. Association Management Experience

A homeowner association management company should have years of experience in dealing with various issues that arise within homeowner associations. Experience reading and understanding the governing documents of homeowner associations. A good homeowner association management company knows the best way to advise and apply covenant enforcement, describe these matters s clearly, and communicate changes to the HOA community members in the most efficient manner possible.

2. Fiscal and Administrative Responsibilities

The homeowner association management company manages the financial matters of the HOA at the direction of the HOA board of directors. The association management company is responsible for financial tasks such as paying invoices and billing members. The HOA management company assists the HOA board of directors in finding and hiring service providers for repairs and routine maintenance. The HOA management company keeps the HOA’s financial records for audits. Essentially, an HOA management company makes accounting and administrative processes easier by guaranteeing that all operations are legal.

3. Community Commitment

An HOA management company is only as good as the homeowner association it serves; thus, they take great care and responsibility in establishing the best community environment possible. A good association management company should always strive to make sure the HOA board of directors is making the best decisions possible.

5. Assist in Finding and Hiring Vendors

HOA board members do not always have the resources and network connections to locate the most cost-effective and high-quality vendors. With the assistance of an HOA management company, that firm will typically have a huge array of resources to find quality vendors to recommend to a board of directors.

6. Keep the Board of Directors Abreast of Issues

An aspect of the association management company’s responsibilities includes providing the board of directors information, such as pending legislation, that could impact the HOA. Furthermore, the HOA management company educates the membership on issues that can impact the HOA

7. Adding Value to the Property

The entire HOA will benefit from the presence of an HOA community manager. The ultimate goal of the HOA board of directors and the association management company are to improve overall property values within the homeowner association. Professional management is more of an investment in the community, and you can be certain that all members will benefit in the short term and long term.

In Waynesville, the following sites are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

The Boone-Withers House, Citizens Bank and Trust Company Building, Former, Francis Grist Mill, Frog Level Historic District, Haywood County Courthouse, Alden and Thomasene Howell House, Masonic Hall, Charles, and Annie Quinlan House, Clyde H. Ray Sr. House, Frank Smathers House, Spread Out Historic District, Waynesville Municipal Building, Dr. J. Howell Way House, and Waynesville Main Street Historic District.

Need Association Management?

Contact Us