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Whitsett NC


William Douglas Property Management offers HOA management and Association Management in Whitsett, NC

Whitsett, NC facts and information

Whitsett, North Carolina, or the Town of Whitsett, is located in the eastern part of Guilford County. Whitsett is a small town located in the northern Piedmont region of North Carolina. The population of Whitsett is around 600. The Town of Whitsett was incorporated on July 13, 1991.

  • Of the 550 municipalities within North Carolina, Whitsett is within the lower 25% of the lower population-sized municipalities.
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, Whitsett’s population was computed to be 590. Which was a 14% population decline from the 2000 United States Census.
  • The first Census carried out for Whitsett after incorporation in 1991 was the 2000 United States Census. This Census calculated the population at 686.
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, the land area of Whitsett was 2.8 square miles.
  • The coordinates or location of Whitsett per Google Earth – Latitude: 36°04′36.26″N, Longitude: 79°34′11.68″ W
  • Elevation of Whitsett at the above coordinates or location per Google Earth is 687 feet.
  • U.S. Highway 70 and N.C. 100 are the main thoroughfares in Whitsett. The very southern edge of the town limits abuts Interstate 40 / Interstate 85.
  • The City of Burlington is east and south of Whitsett. The Town of Gibsonville is east and north of Whitsett. To the south and west of Whitsett are areas of unincorporated parts of Guilford County.

Probably the most famous person from Whitsett was William Thornton Whitsett, Ph.D. (08/05/1866 – 03/22/1934). William Thornton Whitsett Ph.D. was a renowned educator and historian who was born in Whitsett. He was the only son of Joseph (1835-1917) and Mary Foust Whitsett (1845-1938), who were of Scots-Irish and German descent. In his youth,  Dr. Whitsett was taught by tutors and educated in public and private institutions of learning. He began teaching public school at the age of sixteen. He attended the University of North Carolina from 1886 until 1888 and the North Carolina College in Mount Pleasant in 1901 and 1903. Dr. Whitsett was awarded an honorary doctor of letters from Lenoir-Rhyne College in 1933 for his years of service.

Dr. Whitsett was greatly influenced by the Methodist minister and pioneering educator Brantley York. York is best known for founding the educational institution that would become Duke University. Dr. Whitsett founded the Whitsett Institute in 1888 in what would become the Town of Whitsett. The original settlement of Whitsett slowly grew up around the institute.

The Whitsett Institute was a boy’s boarding school that was in operation from 1888 until it was destroyed by fire in 1918. The students were primarily from North Carolina and southern states. However, students from Cuba were admitted. The Whitsett Institute was reportedly the first educational institution in North Carolina to admit Cubans into their student body. Additionally, the institute’s Cuban graduates were the first Cuban students admitted to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The annual enrollment of Whitsett Institute averaged between 200 to 250 students. The courses of study were based in liberal arts, with business and teacher preparatory courses. Dr. Whitsett had teaching institutes in several counties within North Carolina.

Dr. Whitsett formed the North Carolina Association of Academies. He served as secretary and treasurer of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly.  He served as the president of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly from 1905 until 1906. Dr. Whitsett served as a trustee of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1897 until 1919. He served on the Guilford County Board of Education from 1897 to 1918. He served as the chairman of the Guilford County Board of Education in 1906.

Dr. Whitsett was an accomplished writer and a member of several literary societies and historical societies. He pursued literary research, publishing his writings, and pursued other literary activities. Saber and Song, a volume of Dr. Whitsett’s poetry, was published by the Whitsett Institute in 1917. He wrote numerous literary reviews and essays for regional publications. He was a historian and a Lutheran. He devoted much of his religious research to the early church within North Carolina. Whitsett was in demand to speak before state and national Lutheran groups because of extensive knowledge on this topic. Dr. Whitsett was appointed Guilford County’s official historian, and he performed in-depth historical research of both Guilford and Alamance counties.

Much of Dr. Whitsett’s research dealt with the genealogical histories of Guilford and Alamance counties. His knowledge on this topic put him in much demand for personal appearances at family reunions during the 1920s and 1930s. Dr. Whitsett spoke before many civic organizations on the topic of education and history throughout his career.

Dr. Whitsett married Carrie Elizabeth Brewer Whitsett (1883-1976) of Salem, North Carolina, in 1906. The couple had four children: Lucille Elizabeth Whitsett Holt (1907-2002), William Thornton Whitsett (1911-2001), Carrie Brewer Whitsett Hayes (1914-2000), and Joseph Gordon Whitsett (1920-2007).

Carrie Whitsett was a graduate of Salem College.  She became president of the Women’s Lutheran Missionary Societies of North Carolina. She was also the president of the State Federation of Home Demonstration Clubs.

Whitsett Historic District

The Whitsett Historic District is a national historic district located at Whitsett. The district comprises thirty-eight supporting buildings, one supporting site, and five supporting structures in the crossroads settlement of Whitsett.

The supporting buildings were constructed between 1894 and 1921 and developed around the Whitsett Institute, which was in operation from 1888 to 1919. Also located in the Whitsett Historic District and separately listed is Holly Gate. Other noteworthy structures include the Queen Anne/Colonial Revival style “The Oaks,” the John Rankin House, the Captain Dick House, the Wimbish-Tayler House, the Jefferson Lamb Houses, the Swift-Wheeler House, and the 1894 Charles T. Mason House and Dormitory. The Whitsett Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Distance to other Points:

Whitsett to:

Greensboro, North Carolina – 16 miles

Winston-Salem, North Carolina – 41 miles

Burlington, North Carolina – 9 miles

Durham, North Carolina – 41 miles

Raleigh, North Carolina – 63 miles

Cary, North Carolina – 58 miles

Capel Hill, North Carolina – 38 miles

Charlotte, North Carolina – 102 miles

Asheville, North Carolina – 185 miles

Wilmington, North Carolina – 195 miles

Atlanta, Georgia – 344 miles

Richmond, Virginia – 503 miles

whitsett nc

William Douglas Property Management offers HOA management and Association Management in Whitsett, NC

 

Whitsett, NC facts and information

Whitsett, North Carolina, or the Town of Whitsett, is located in the eastern part of Guilford County. Whitsett is a small town located in the northern Piedmont region of North Carolina. The population of Whitsett is around 600. The Town of Whitsett was incorporated on July 13, 1991.

  • Of the 550 municipalities within North Carolina, Whitsett is within the lower 25% of the lower population-sized municipalities. 
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, Whitsett’s population was computed to be 590. Which was a 14% population decline from the 2000 United States Census.
  • The first Census carried out for Whitsett after incorporation in 1991 was the 2000 United States Census. This Census calculated the population at 686. 
  • Per the 2010 United States Census, the land area of Whitsett was 2.8 square miles.  
  • The coordinates or location of Whitsett per Google Earth – Latitude: 36°04′36.26″N, Longitude: 79°34′11.68″ W
  • Elevation of Whitsett at the above coordinates or location per Google Earth is 687 feet.
  • U.S. Highway 70 and N.C. 100 are the main thoroughfares in Whitsett. The very southern edge of the town limits abuts Interstate 40 / Interstate 85.
  • The City of Burlington is east and south of Whitsett. The Town of Gibsonville is east and north of Whitsett. To the south and west of Whitsett are areas of unincorporated parts of Guilford County.

Probably the most famous person from Whitsett was William Thornton Whitsett, Ph.D. (08/05/1866 – 03/22/1934). William Thornton Whitsett Ph.D. was a renowned educator and historian who was born in Whitsett. He was the only son of Joseph (1835-1917) and Mary Foust Whitsett (1845-1938), who were of Scots-Irish and German descent. In his youth,  Dr. Whitsett was taught by tutors and educated in public and private institutions of learning. He began teaching public school at the age of sixteen. He attended the University of North Carolina from 1886 until 1888 and the North Carolina College in Mount Pleasant in 1901 and 1903. Dr. Whitsett was awarded an honorary doctor of letters from Lenoir-Rhyne College in 1933 for his years of service.

Dr. Whitsett was greatly influenced by the Methodist minister and pioneering educator Brantley York. York is best known for founding the educational institution that would become Duke University. Dr. Whitsett founded the Whitsett Institute in 1888 in what would become the Town of Whitsett. The original settlement of Whitsett slowly grew up around the institute. 

The Whitsett Institute was a boy’s boarding school that was in operation from 1888 until it was destroyed by fire in 1918. The students were primarily from North Carolina and southern states. However, students from Cuba were admitted. The Whitsett Institute was reportedly the first educational institution in North Carolina to admit Cubans into their student body. Additionally, the institute’s Cuban graduates were the first Cuban students admitted to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The annual enrollment of Whitsett Institute averaged between 200 to 250 students. The courses of study were based in liberal arts, with business and teacher preparatory courses. Dr. Whitsett had teaching institutes in several counties within North Carolina.

Dr. Whitsett formed the North Carolina Association of Academies. He served as secretary and treasurer of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly.  He served as the president of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly from 1905 until 1906. Dr. Whitsett served as a trustee of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1897 until 1919. He served on the Guilford County Board of Education from 1897 to 1918. He served as the chairman of the Guilford County Board of Education in 1906.

Dr. Whitsett was an accomplished writer and a member of several literary societies and historical societies. He pursued literary research, publishing his writings, and pursued other literary activities. Saber and Song, a volume of Dr. Whitsett’s poetry, was published by the Whitsett Institute in 1917. He wrote numerous literary reviews and essays for regional publications. He was a historian and a Lutheran. He devoted much of his religious research to the early church within North Carolina. Whitsett was in demand to speak before state and national Lutheran groups because of extensive knowledge on this topic. Dr. Whitsett was appointed Guilford County’s official historian, and he performed in-depth historical research of both Guilford and Alamance counties.  

Much of Dr. Whitsett’s research dealt with the genealogical histories of Guilford and Alamance counties. His knowledge on this topic put him in much demand for personal appearances at family reunions during the 1920s and 1930s. Dr. Whitsett spoke before many civic organizations on the topic of education and history throughout his career. 

Dr. Whitsett married Carrie Elizabeth Brewer Whitsett (1883-1976) of Salem, North Carolina, in 1906. The couple had four children: Lucille Elizabeth Whitsett Holt (1907-2002), William Thornton Whitsett (1911-2001), Carrie Brewer Whitsett Hayes (1914-2000), and Joseph Gordon Whitsett (1920-2007).

Carrie Whitsett was a graduate of Salem College.  She became president of the Women’s Lutheran Missionary Societies of North Carolina. She was also the president of the State Federation of Home Demonstration Clubs. 

Whitsett Historic District

The Whitsett Historic District is a national historic district located at Whitsett. The district comprises thirty-eight supporting buildings, one supporting site, and five supporting structures in the crossroads settlement of Whitsett. 

The supporting buildings were constructed between 1894 and 1921 and developed around the Whitsett Institute, which was in operation from 1888 to 1919. Also located in the Whitsett Historic District and separately listed is Holly Gate. Other noteworthy structures include the Queen Anne/Colonial Revival style “The Oaks,” the John Rankin House, the Captain Dick House, the Wimbish-Tayler House, the Jefferson Lamb Houses, the Swift-Wheeler House, and the 1894 Charles T. Mason House and Dormitory. The Whitsett Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Distance to other Points:

Whitsett to:

Greensboro, North Carolina – 16 miles

Winston-Salem, North Carolina – 41 miles

Burlington, North Carolina – 9 miles

Durham, North Carolina – 41 miles

Raleigh, North Carolina – 63 miles

Cary, North Carolina – 58 miles

Capel Hill, North Carolina – 38 miles

Charlotte, North Carolina – 102 miles

Asheville, North Carolina – 185 miles

Wilmington, North Carolina – 195 miles

Atlanta, Georgia – 344 miles

Richmond, Virginia – 503 miles

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