Need Association Management?

Contact Us

Woodfin NC

Woodfin is a small town adjacent to Asheville in Buncombe County, North Carolina. The Cherokee Indians were the first recorded inhabitants of the future Woodfin area. Woodfin was incorporated as a town in 1971. However, the settlement’s origin goes back to the mid-1800s. 

  • The population per the 2020 United States Census of Woodfin was calculated to be 7,936. This is a 7.1% growth rate since the 2010 United States Census. 
  • The population per the 2010 United States Census of Woodfin was calculated to be 6,123.
  • The first Census for Woodfin was the 1980 United States Census, and the population was calculated in this Census to be 3,260.
  • The population per square mile of Woodfin is 696.7 per the 2010 United States Census  
  • Woodfin is the 118th largest municipality in North Carolina.
  • The land area of Woodfin is 8.79 square miles per the 2010 United States Census.  
  • Coordinates of Woodfin per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°38′00.40″N, Longitude: 82°34′55.46″ W
  • Woodfin is named for Nicholas Washington Woodfin. 
  • The 2019 median household income in Woodfin was $48,202.
  • Per the United States Census Bureau, there are 2,495 households in Woodfin.
  • Elevation of Woodfin 2,142 feet per Google Earth.
  • The Woodfin Water District was established in the 1920s to provide clean water to the community’s citizens.  
  • The Woodfin School in 1927 was the largest school in Buncombe County, with just over 900 students. 

Woodfin is named for Nicholas Washington Woodfin (1810 – 1876). Nicholas Washington Woodfin was a multifaceted person with a diverse background without an advanced formal education that did not go beyond local schooling. Nonetheless, N.W. Woodfin was an accomplished attorney, legislator, and planter. He was born in the Mills River area of Buncombe County that would later become part of Henderson County. N.W. Woodfin was born into the prosperous farming family of John and Mary Woodfin. He was the fourth of twelve children. 

N.W. Woodfin practiced law in Asheville. However, he is most recognized for his service as a five-term North Carolina State Senator from the Buncombe and Henderson District beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1852. He served with distinction on the Committee on the Judiciary and served as its chairman during his last three terms. N.W. Woodfin is said to have understood that roads, turnpikes, and railroads were vital to the development and modernization of the mountains of North Carolina. Thus, he was one of the greatest advocates of their implementation while in office in the North Carolina Senate.

N.W. Woodfin had extensive land holdings in the French Broad River Valley and owned 122 slaves per the 1860 United States Census. Reportedly, N.W. Woodfin being a Whig, had Unionist sympathies before the American Civil War and opposed secession. Nonetheless, he represented Buncombe County in the Secession Convention and voted for secession. Apparently, at the conclusion of the American Civil War, his financial position had been diminished, and he returned to Asheville to practicing law. 

In the development of the mountain region of North Carolina, N.W. Woodfin encouraged a diverse agricultural base, with tobacco and dairy farming leading the way. He also supported diversified industries, and for a time after the Civil War, owned a cheese factory to help encourage dairy farming. He took the lead in public education in the mountain region. N.W. Woodfin was such a trusted member of the post-war citizenry during Reconstruction he was appointed to a commission to investigate corruption with the Western Division of the Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 

Agriculture played an early role in the settlement of the future Woodfin area in the mid-1800s. However, manufacturing, specifically textile manufacturing, played a huge role in the economic development of Woodfin. This had a great deal to do with the French Broad River running through Woodfin and the free hydroelectric power it provided. The last major textile mill, Burlington Industries, shut down in June of 1991, eliminating just over 450 local textile jobs. The mill on Riverside Drive had been in operation since the early 1900s and had been operated by Burlington Industries since 1957.  

The Elk Mountain Steam Generating Plant, also known as the North Carolina Electrical Power Company Electric Generating Plant, was constructed in 1916. It is a historic power generating station located at 2024 Riverside Drive in Woodfin. It is a rectangular, brick one-story structure with its original 250-foot-tall brick smokestack. The facility was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Some of the original neighborhoods within Woodfin still reflect names dating back to the origins of the manufacturing age of the community “Company Bottom” and “Martel Village.” Many of the original neighborhoods are, in fact, mill villages like what is still found throughout the United States. Textiles and other manufacturing drove the Woodfin economy until the 1980s. The population of Woodfin dropped by 524 people by the 1990 United States Census.

Historical Population per the United States Census of Woodfin

CensusPopulation

1980 3,260

1990 2,736

2000 3,162

2010 6,123

2020 7,936

The increase in textile automation and the drop in domestic textile production can be created with the drop in Woodfin’s population during the 1980s. Nevertheless, the 1993 ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA, the trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico, had a devastating effect on textile production in the south. The North American Free Trade Agreement began adversely affecting domestic textile production almost immediately. Because of automation and less expensive foreign imports, decreasing employment trends in the textile industry had already been occurring for at least a decade before NAFTA, but the trade agreement drastically intensified this trend and wreaked havoc on many small communities.

The decline of the local Woodfin economy brought with it more than the loss of population, but the loss of property values and a rise in social problems for a time. This economic and population decline began to reverse itself in the mid to late 1990s. Woodfin developed a more diverse economy with new manufacturing jobs and service jobs. In addition, Woodfin has transitioned into a bedroom community for Asheville.

Benefits of Hiring an Experienced HOA Management Company

Serving on a homeowner association board of directors can be a rewarding and challenging role. Rewarding in what positive things can be accomplished by someone who is dedicated to the betterment of their homeowner association. A challenge in that serving on a board of directors is a volunteer position and all the many responsibilities that can arise from serving on the board. It is safe to say, with the right professional association management company, an HOA board of directors can accomplish so much more than it can on its own. 

To summarize, having the support of an experienced HOA management company makes it much easier for an HOA board to perform its duties. What follows is a summary of the services that a professional HOA management company can provide to your homeowners’ association:

● Effective and proactive membership communications

● Covenant enforcement

● Membership billing

● Paying Homeowner Association invoices

● Delinquent membership billing

● Assisting board of directors with hiring and overseeing vendors

The wrong association management company can be a source of frustration for many boards of directors and homeowner association memberships. That’s why it is critical to select an experienced and trustworthy homeowner association property management company that provides excellent service. 

woodfin NC


The town of Apex has grown rapidly in the past decades, owing a lot of this expansion to its proximity to the Research Triangle.

Woodfin is a small town adjacent to Asheville in Buncombe County, North Carolina. The Cherokee Indians were the first recorded inhabitants of the future Woodfin area. Woodfin was incorporated as a town in 1971. However, the settlement’s origin goes back to the mid-1800s.

  • The population per the 2020 United States Census of Woodfin was calculated to be 7,936. This is a 7.1% growth rate since the 2010 United States Census.
  • The population per the 2010 United States Census of Woodfin was calculated to be 6,123.
  • The first Census for Woodfin was the 1980 United States Census, and the population was calculated in this Census to be 3,260.
  • The population per square mile of Woodfin is 696.7 per the 2010 United States Census
  • Woodfin is the 118th largest municipality in North Carolina.
  • The land area of Woodfin is 8.79 square miles per the 2010 United States Census.
  • Coordinates of Woodfin per Google Earth – Latitude: 35°38′00.40″N, Longitude: 82°34′55.46″ W
  • Woodfin is named for Nicholas Washington Woodfin.
  • The 2019 median household income in Woodfin was $48,202.
  • Per the United States Census Bureau, there are 2,495 households in Woodfin.
  • Elevation of Woodfin 2,142 feet per Google Earth.
  • The Woodfin Water District was established in the 1920s to provide clean water to the community’s citizens.
  • The Woodfin School in 1927 was the largest school in Buncombe County, with just over 900 students.

Woodfin is named for Nicholas Washington Woodfin (1810 – 1876). Nicholas Washington Woodfin was a multifaceted person with a diverse background without an advanced formal education that did not go beyond local schooling. Nonetheless, N.W. Woodfin was an accomplished attorney, legislator, and planter. He was born in the Mills River area of Buncombe County that would later become part of Henderson County. N.W. Woodfin was born into the prosperous farming family of John and Mary Woodfin. He was the fourth of twelve children.

N.W. Woodfin practiced law in Asheville. However, he is most recognized for his service as a five-term North Carolina State Senator from the Buncombe and Henderson District beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1852. He served with distinction on the Committee on the Judiciary and served as its chairman during his last three terms. N.W. Woodfin is said to have understood that roads, turnpikes, and railroads were vital to the development and modernization of the mountains of North Carolina. Thus, he was one of the greatest advocates of their implementation while in office in the North Carolina Senate.

N.W. Woodfin had extensive land holdings in the French Broad River Valley and owned 122 slaves per the 1860 United States Census. Reportedly, N.W. Woodfin being a Whig, had Unionist sympathies before the American Civil War and opposed secession. Nonetheless, he represented Buncombe County in the Secession Convention and voted for secession. Apparently, at the conclusion of the American Civil War, his financial position had been diminished, and he returned to Asheville to practicing law.

In the development of the mountain region of North Carolina, N.W. Woodfin encouraged a diverse agricultural base, with tobacco and dairy farming leading the way. He also supported diversified industries, and for a time after the Civil War, owned a cheese factory to help encourage dairy farming. He took the lead in public education in the mountain region. N.W. Woodfin was such a trusted member of the post-war citizenry during Reconstruction he was appointed to a commission to investigate corruption with the Western Division of the Western North Carolina Railroad Company.

Agriculture played an early role in the settlement of the future Woodfin area in the mid-1800s. However, manufacturing, specifically textile manufacturing, played a huge role in the economic development of Woodfin. This had a great deal to do with the French Broad River running through Woodfin and the free hydroelectric power it provided. The last major textile mill, Burlington Industries, shut down in June of 1991, eliminating just over 450 local textile jobs. The mill on Riverside Drive had been in operation since the early 1900s and had been operated by Burlington Industries since 1957.

The Elk Mountain Steam Generating Plant, also known as the North Carolina Electrical Power Company Electric Generating Plant, was constructed in 1916. It is a historic power generating station located at 2024 Riverside Drive in Woodfin. It is a rectangular, brick one-story structure with its original 250-foot-tall brick smokestack. The facility was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Some of the original neighborhoods within Woodfin still reflect names dating back to the origins of the manufacturing age of the community “Company Bottom” and “Martel Village.” Many of the original neighborhoods are, in fact, mill villages like what is still found throughout the United States. Textiles and other manufacturing drove the Woodfin economy until the 1980s. The population of Woodfin dropped by 524 people by the 1990 United States Census.

Historical Population per the United States Census of Woodfin

CensusPopulation

1980 3,260

1990 2,736

2000 3,162

2010 6,123

2020 7,936

The increase in textile automation and the drop in domestic textile production can be created with the drop in Woodfin’s population during the 1980s. Nevertheless, the 1993 ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA, the trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico, had a devastating effect on textile production in the south. The North American Free Trade Agreement began adversely affecting domestic textile production almost immediately. Because of automation and less expensive foreign imports, decreasing employment trends in the textile industry had already been occurring for at least a decade before NAFTA, but the trade agreement drastically intensified this trend and wreaked havoc on many small communities.

The decline of the local Woodfin economy brought with it more than the loss of population, but the loss of property values and a rise in social problems for a time. This economic and population decline began to reverse itself in the mid to late 1990s. Woodfin developed a more diverse economy with new manufacturing jobs and service jobs. In addition, Woodfin has transitioned into a bedroom community for Asheville.

Benefits of Hiring an Experienced HOA Management Company

Serving on a homeowner association board of directors can be a rewarding and challenging role. Rewarding in what positive things can be accomplished by someone who is dedicated to the betterment of their homeowner association. A challenge in that serving on a board of directors is a volunteer position and all the many responsibilities that can arise from serving on the board. It is safe to say, with the right professional association management company, an HOA board of directors can accomplish so much more than it can on its own.

To summarize, having the support of an experienced HOA management company makes it much easier for an HOA board to perform its duties. What follows is a summary of the services that a professional HOA management company can provide to your homeowners’ association:

● Effective and proactive membership communications

● Covenant enforcement

● Membership billing

● Paying Homeowner Association invoices

● Delinquent membership billing

● Assisting board of directors with hiring and overseeing vendors

The wrong association management company can be a source of frustration for many boards of directors and homeowner association memberships. That’s why it is critical to select an experienced and trustworthy homeowner association property management company that provides excellent service.

Need Association Management?

Contact Us