Youngsville NC

Youngsville, North Carolina, or the Town of Youngsville, is mostly located in Franklin County. Youngsville is directly northeast of the towns of Wake Forest and Raleigh, the state capital. Youngsville was founded around 1839 and incorporated in 1875. The 2010 U.S. Census placed Youngsville’s population at 1,157. The U.S. Census 2019 population estimate was 1,375. Youngsville’s zip code is 27596.

The Youngsville settlement was founded on land owned by John “Jack” Young around 1839. Originally, there was a great deal of confusion about the name of the town. The post office said the name of the town was “Pacific,” but the train depot had the name of the town as “Youngsville.” So, when a man got on the train for Pacific, the conductor had to tell him that Youngsville and Pacific were the exact same place. No matter what the sign says at the depot, it is Pacific too. Then when the town merchant ordered supplies for his store, he had to have the supplies shipped to the Youngsville train depot, he had to have the bill mailed to the Pacific post office.

From the November 1, 1877, Raleigh News & Observer: “….Mr. John Creech of this city, spent two days in Youngsville or Pacific, as the village is more familiarly known, and within….”

The issue of two names was mostly resolved when the town incorporated on March 17, 1875, as Youngsville. This name was selected to honor John “Jack” Young who was the original landowner.

Franklin County’s first settler is thought to be John Terrell around the 1730s. Land grants were given to Henry Ivy, William Southerland, and Robert Southerland in 1745. The population gradually increased over time and along with this came enterprises to meet the population’s needs. The Blandford-Bute Lodge, the first Masonic lodge in the county, was formed in 1766. A grist mill called Whittaker’s Mill was constructed in 1770 on Lynch Creek or Linches Creek. Most early settlers were subsistent farmers who grew their food and produced many of their own tools. Manufacturing their own clothing would be common as well for this type settler.

However, there were individuals with larger land parcels that were much more than subsistent farmers. One such person was Jeremiah Perry who received two Granville land grants. His first land grant consisted of 382 acres in 1752. His second received in 1763 was for seven hundred acres.

As Franklin County progressed into the 19th century, North Carolina’s population grew as well as Franklin County’s population. Most landowners were still primarily subsistence farmers who hunted to subsidize their diet. Towns or villages, for the most part, were still small if they existed at all. Grist mills were probably the most common enterprise that drew the population together and provided them the ability to purchase or trade for other goods.

In Franklin County, the development of churches and schools were just in its infancy in the early part of the 19th century. It is not known for certain, but possibly the first church erected in the county was the Church of England’s Portage (or Portridge) Chapel; thought to be built before 1775 and stood until the 1860s. This chapel is gone; however, the chapel’s graveyard remains with tombstones noting the names of early settlers to Franklin County. Maple Springs Baptist Church, Sandy Creek Church, and Popes Chapel were all early churches.

Located near Youngsville is the William A. Jeffreys House. This is a historic plantation house constructed around 1842. It is built in the Federal style frame dwelling that is made up of a two-story central structure with single-story flanking wings. The plantation’s interior finish is Greek Revival. The plantation was added in 1976 to the National Register of Historic Places.

An unusual side story is about the death of a Jeffreys’ family member who was buried in a rock. William Jeffreys, the son, was only 28 when he was elected to the North Carolina Senate in 1844. Upon returning from a trip in September of 1845 he fell ill with bilious fever. Bilious fever is now an obsolete medical diagnosis of fever with symptoms of excessive bile in the bloodstream and tissues, causing jaundice. A common cause of this condition was malaria.

While he lay suffering from the fever, Jeffreys hallucinated about death. He repeatedly told everyone of his fear of being buried in the earth. He reportedly said, “Bury me in rock.” Because of his youth and overall health, he was expected to fully recover, and everyone took his rantings about death as part of his fever and hallucinations. However, his condition continued to deteriorate, and his father reluctantly agreed to his burial wishes. On October 3, 1845, Jeffreys succumbed to the fever and died at 29 years of age.

William A. Jeffreys, the grieving father, contacted a stonemason to inquire if his son’s burial request of being sealed in rock could be accomplished. The stonemason was told about a large boulder on the family’s property that was 10 feet tall with a 20-foot circumference. The mason told the father that this type of burial could be accomplished. It reportedly took the mason over a year to chisel out and modify the boulder, but it was accomplished.

This boulder is located on private property next to the Pearce Family Cemetery.

The railroad came to Youngsville in the 1870s. Youngsville was a key shipping point between Raleigh and Portsmouth for the Seaboard Air Line System railroad. (In the time before airplanes, air line was a common term for the shortest distance between two points, a straight line drawn on a map.) This line provided service to Norfolk, Virginia’s port for water transportation abroad.

After the American Civil War cotton was the leading crop in the Youngsville area. However, by the 1890s tobacco cultivation took the lead. While there was a thriving cotton market in Youngsville, the tobacco market along with the tobacco dealers, and the tobacco warehouses became the leading economic driver for the area into the 1970s.

As the cultivation of tobacco began to decline, crop cultivation diversified to better meet economic conditions and needs. The agricultural economy of Youngsville has still declined or more accurately has been outpaced by demographic shifts. The population of the Youngsville area has grown, and the new residents are commuting to other towns for work.

Youngsville may not be growing as fast as neighboring Wake Forest, but there has been a great deal of residential development in the area since the early 2000s. Along with this residential development, related commercial development has followed with a grocery store, convenience stores, and the like.

The population of Youngsville for their first U.S. Census in 1880 of 117 to their Census in 2010 of 1,157, indicates steady growth. The U.S. Census population estimate for 2019 was 1,375.

Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1880 117 —
1890 205 75.2%
1900 345 68.3%
1910 431 24.9%
1920 414 −3.9%
1930 395 −4.6%
1940 553 40.0%
1950 619 11.9%
1960 596 −3.7%
1970 555 −6.9%
1980 486 −12.4%
1990 424 −12.8%
2000 651 53.5%
2010 1,157 77.7%
2019 (est.) 1,375 18.8%

Highways & Roads

U.S. 1 or Capital Boulevard runs west of Youngsville is easily accessible.
NC 96 runs directly through Youngsville.

Rail Service
Amtrak does not offer passenger service through Youngsville. Raleigh has an Amtrak station with regular passenger service that is around a 22-mile drive from Youngsville.

Air Service
The most convenient commercial air service for Youngsville is Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU). The following airlines currently serve Raleigh-Durham: Air Canada Express, Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, American Eagle, Delta Air Lines, Delta Connection, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines, Sun Country Airlines, United Airlines, and United Express.

Education
The schools in Youngsville are well-rated from primary to secondary. There are eleven top-ranked colleges or universities in the Youngsville area.

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Youngsville nc

Youngsville, North Carolina, or the Town of Youngsville, is mostly located in Franklin County. Youngsville is directly northeast of the towns of Wake Forest and Raleigh, the state capital. Youngsville was founded around 1839 and incorporated in 1875. The 2010 U.S. Census placed Youngsville’s population at 1,157. The U.S. Census 2019 population estimate was 1,375. Youngsville’s zip code is 27596.

The Youngsville settlement was founded on land owned by John “Jack” Young around 1839. Originally, there was a great deal of confusion about the name of the town. The post office said the name of the town was “Pacific,” but the train depot had the name of the town as “Youngsville.” So, when a man got on the train for Pacific, the conductor had to tell him that Youngsville and Pacific were the exact same place. No matter what the sign says at the depot, it is Pacific too. Then when the town merchant ordered supplies for his store, he had to have the supplies shipped to the Youngsville train depot, he had to have the bill mailed to the Pacific post office.

From the November 1, 1877, Raleigh News & Observer: “….Mr. John Creech of this city, spent two days in Youngsville or Pacific, as the village is more familiarly known, and within….”

The issue of two names was mostly resolved when the town incorporated on March 17, 1875, as Youngsville. This name was selected to honor John “Jack” Young who was the original landowner.

Franklin County’s first settler is thought to be John Terrell around the 1730s. Land grants were given to Henry Ivy, William Southerland, and Robert Southerland in 1745. The population gradually increased over time and along with this came enterprises to meet the population’s needs. The Blandford-Bute Lodge, the first Masonic lodge in the county, was formed in 1766. A grist mill called Whittaker’s Mill was constructed in 1770 on Lynch Creek or Linches Creek. Most early settlers were subsistent farmers who grew their food and produced many of their own tools. Manufacturing their own clothing would be common as well for this type settler.

However, there were individuals with larger land parcels that were much more than subsistent farmers. One such person was Jeremiah Perry who received two Granville land grants. His first land grant consisted of 382 acres in 1752. His second received in 1763 was for seven hundred acres.

As Franklin County progressed into the 19th century, North Carolina’s population grew as well as Franklin County’s population. Most landowners were still primarily subsistence farmers who hunted to subsidize their diet. Towns or villages, for the most part, were still small if they existed at all. Grist mills were probably the most common enterprise that drew the population together and provided them the ability to purchase or trade for other goods.

In Franklin County, the development of churches and schools were just in its infancy in the early part of the 19th century. It is not known for certain, but possibly the first church erected in the county was the Church of England’s Portage (or Portridge) Chapel; thought to be built before 1775 and stood until the 1860s. This chapel is gone; however, the chapel’s graveyard remains with tombstones noting the names of early settlers to Franklin County. Maple Springs Baptist Church, Sandy Creek Church, and Popes Chapel were all early churches.

Located near Youngsville is the William A. Jeffreys House. This is a historic plantation house constructed around 1842. It is built in the Federal style frame dwelling that is made up of a two-story central structure with single-story flanking wings. The plantation’s interior finish is Greek Revival. The plantation was added in 1976 to the National Register of Historic Places.

An unusual side story is about the death of a Jeffreys’ family member who was buried in a rock. William Jeffreys, the son, was only 28 when he was elected to the North Carolina Senate in 1844. Upon returning from a trip in September of 1845 he fell ill with bilious fever. Bilious fever is now an obsolete medical diagnosis of fever with symptoms of excessive bile in the bloodstream and tissues, causing jaundice. A common cause of this condition was malaria.

While he lay suffering from the fever, Jeffreys hallucinated about death. He repeatedly told everyone of his fear of being buried in the earth. He reportedly said, “Bury me in rock.” Because of his youth and overall health, he was expected to fully recover, and everyone took his rantings about death as part of his fever and hallucinations. However, his condition continued to deteriorate, and his father reluctantly agreed to his burial wishes. On October 3, 1845, Jeffreys succumbed to the fever and died at 29 years of age.

William A. Jeffreys, the grieving father, contacted a stonemason to inquire if his son’s burial request of being sealed in rock could be accomplished. The stonemason was told about a large boulder on the family’s property that was 10 feet tall with a 20-foot circumference. The mason told the father that this type of burial could be accomplished. It reportedly took the mason over a year to chisel out and modify the boulder, but it was accomplished.

This boulder is located on private property next to the Pearce Family Cemetery.

The railroad came to Youngsville in the 1870s. Youngsville was a key shipping point between Raleigh and Portsmouth for the Seaboard Air Line System railroad. (In the time before airplanes, air line was a common term for the shortest distance between two points, a straight line drawn on a map.) This line provided service to Norfolk, Virginia’s port for water transportation abroad.

After the American Civil War cotton was the leading crop in the Youngsville area. However, by the 1890s tobacco cultivation took the lead. While there was a thriving cotton market in Youngsville, the tobacco market along with the tobacco dealers, and the tobacco warehouses became the leading economic driver for the area into the 1970s.

As the cultivation of tobacco began to decline, crop cultivation diversified to better meet economic conditions and needs. The agricultural economy of Youngsville has still declined or more accurately has been outpaced by demographic shifts. The population of the Youngsville area has grown, and the new residents are commuting to other towns for work.

Youngsville may not be growing as fast as neighboring Wake Forest, but there has been a great deal of residential development in the area since the early 2000s. Along with this residential development, related commercial development has followed with a grocery store, convenience stores, and the like.

The population of Youngsville for their first U.S. Census in 1880 of 117 to their Census in 2010 of 1,157, indicates steady growth. The U.S. Census population estimate for 2019 was 1,375.

Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1880 117 —
1890 205 75.2%
1900 345 68.3%
1910 431 24.9%
1920 414 −3.9%
1930 395 −4.6%
1940 553 40.0%
1950 619 11.9%
1960 596 −3.7%
1970 555 −6.9%
1980 486 −12.4%
1990 424 −12.8%
2000 651 53.5%
2010 1,157 77.7%
2019 (est.) 1,375 18.8%

Highways & Roads

U.S. 1 or Capital Boulevard runs west of Youngsville is easily accessible.
NC 96 runs directly through Youngsville.

Rail Service
Amtrak does not offer passenger service through Youngsville. Raleigh has an Amtrak station with regular passenger service that is around a 22-mile drive from Youngsville.

Air Service
The most convenient commercial air service for Youngsville is Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU). The following airlines currently serve Raleigh-Durham: Air Canada Express, Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, American Eagle, Delta Air Lines, Delta Connection, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines, Sun Country Airlines, United Airlines, and United Express.

Education
The schools in Youngsville are well-rated from primary to secondary. There are eleven top-ranked colleges or universities in the Youngsville area.

Need Association Management?

Contact Us